Miss Keenans class at KhatinasAxh school in the Yukon wins a trip

first_imgLuke SmithAPTN NewsMiss Keenan’s Grade 5, 6 and 7 class at Khatinas.Axh school in the Yukon has won a Parks Canada contest that will see them travel to Manitoba this summer.The school is based in Teslin, a small community about two hours south of Whitehorse.It’s home to about 125 people – mostly Tlingit.The community has a speed limit of 30 kilometres per hour and one of its RCMP cruisers is made out of plywood.But the kindergarten to Grade 8 school, which has about 50 students, plays a big part in the community and is supported by the community’s Elders.One of the challenges this community faces is the preservation of its inland Tlingit language.And how they do that was one of the keys to winning the contest.lsmith@aptn.calast_img read more

California may limit liability of selfdriving carmakers

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO – California regulators are embracing a General Motors recommendation that would help makers of self-driving cars avoid paying for accidents and other trouble, raising concerns that the proposal will put an unfair burden on vehicle owners.If adopted, the regulations drafted by the California Department of Motor Vehicles would protect these carmakers from lawsuits in cases where vehicles haven’t been maintained according to manufacturer specifications.That could open a loophole for automakers to skirt responsibility for accidents, injuries and deaths caused by defective autonomous vehicles, said Armand Feliciano, vice-president for the Association of California Insurance Companies. For instance, manufacturers might avoid liability if the tires on self-driving cars are slightly underinflated or even if the oil hasn’t been changed as regularly as manufacturers suggest, he said.“When is the last time you followed everything that is listed in your car manual?” Feliciano said.The California DMV declined to comment on its proposed regulations because they’re still being finalized.PAVING THE WAY FOR AUTONOMOUS CARSDetermining liability for self-driving cars is just one of the many hurdles that still must be addressed as dozens of automakers and technology companies expand their tests of robotic vehicles cruising public roads scattered across the U.S. Some of these companies are hoping to deploy their self-driving vehicles in ride-hailing services and eventually sell them to consumers within the next few years.As biggest testing ground for self-driving cars, California is being viewed as a bellwether for how other states might sculpt their regulations down the road.The section addressing the limits of automakers’ liability adopts much of the wording proposed in an April 24 letter to the DMV from Paul Hemmersbaugh, formerly chief counsel for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and now chief counsel for the General Motors division overseeing self-driving cars.Consumer Watchdog, an activist group frequently critical of business interests, believes Hemmersbaugh plied the connections he made at the California DMV while working at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to insert the clause that could make it easier for self-driving carmakers to avoid liability.“It is the result of the ongoing and troubling federal revolving door between the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the auto industry,” Consumer Watchdog officials wrote in a letter sent Tuesday to the DMV and the head of the transportation overseeing the agency.“MORAL HAZARD”Under current law, automakers can still be held liable for faulty equipment or other flaws in vehicles that require a human driver, even if the owners haven’t followed all the maintenance instructions.That would change if the DMV’s proposed regulations go on the books as is, warned the Consumer Attorneys of California, a professional association of trial lawyers.“This language creates a dangerous ‘moral hazard’ where manufacturers are encouraged to create unreasonable or impossible maintenance specifications to shift the burden onto (self-driving car) consumers or the public at large for technological failures,” the trade group wrote in its Oct. 25 comments to the DMV.GM spokeswoman Laura Toole lauded the “transparency” of the DMV’s process. Dozens of parties also submitted comments and recommendations, leaving it to the DMV’s staff to decide which to include in the agency’s proposed rules, she said.RULES FOR ROBOTSIn his April 24 letter, Hemmersbaugh linked his recommendations to concerns that self-driving carmakers might be held responsible for all vehicle problems “without taking into account the acts of intervening parties and other factors that contributed to an incident.”Self-driving cars are being touted as safer alternative to vehicles operated by humans who get drunk or distracted. But accidents are still bound to happen, and some are likely to be caused by equipment defects, said Jacqueline Serna, legislative attorney for the Consumer Attorneys of California. And when that happens, she said, it should be left to the courts to draw the lines of liability.“The courts have dealt with new technology in the past and they are equipped to do it again,” Serna said.The issue could end up in court if the DMV doesn’t revise the current wording of its regulations. Consumer Watchdog says it will sue if the current regulations are approved and insurance trade groups say they may take legal action, too.last_img read more

French president says China will buy 184 Airbus jets

first_imgBEIJING, China – China plans to buy 184 Airbus A320 jetliners, French President Emmanuel Macron said Wednesday, in a diplomatic tradition aimed at defusing trade complaints.Chinese President Xi Jinping said his government “will preserve parity” in market share between Airbus and its U.S. rival, Boeing, said Macron at a news conference.China often times announcements of purchases of aircraft and other big-ticket items to coincide with visits by foreign leaders in an effort to defuse trade tensions.Macron said details have yet to be completed and he gave no financial figures. At the list price for A320s, the order could total $18 billion, but large buyers often get deep discounts.“China will preserve its volume of purchases in the future and will preserve parity in market share between Airbus and Boeing,” Macron said.last_img read more

Trump insider and National Enquirer exec leaving Postmedia board of directors

first_imgDonald Trump insider David Pecker is stepping down from the board of Canadian media giant Postmedia Network Canada Corp.The company that owns several of Canada’s biggest daily newspapers says Pecker tendered his resignation so that he can better focus on his other business interests.The CEO of American Media Inc., publisher of the tabloid National Enquirer, was reported last week to have been granted immunity by U.S. federal prosecutors in return for information in their probe of former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen.“David noted that it is important for him to focus his efforts on ensuring that his businesses are best positioned for continued growth,” said Postmedia lead director Peter Sharpe in a news release.Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey thanked Pecker for his service since being appointed to the board of directors in October, 2016.According to a company regulatory filing, Pecker earned fees of $117,500 for about 11 months of service in the fiscal year ended Aug. 31, 2017, and had perfect attendance for nine meetings of Postmedia’s board and five meetings of its compensation and pension committee.His departure is effective immediately.The Associated Press has reported that the Enquirer kept a safe containing documents about hush-money payments and damaging stories it killed as part of its cozy relationship with Trump leading up to 2016 presidential election.Companies mentioned in this article: (TSX:PNC)last_img read more

Husky Energy offers apology for largest ever oil spill off Newfoundland coast

first_imgST. JOHN’S, N.L. — Husky Energy is apologizing for Newfoundland’s largest-ever oil spill last month, which saw 250,000 litres leak into the ocean.The huge spill of oil, water and gas happened while Husky Energy’s SeaRose platform was preparing to restart production during a fierce storm that was, at the time, the most intense in the world.In a statement Monday, the company says it is “deeply sorry” for the incident and is committed to learning from it and putting measures in place “to ensure it doesn’t happen again.”On Friday, Husky submitted its preliminary report on the Nov. 16 spill, stating that it appears that a flowline connector failed near the South White Rose Extension drill centre — about 350 kilometres east of St. John’s.The company says the initial release occurred during the 20 minutes that crews were troubleshooting a drop in flowline pressure, and a retest led to a second release lasting about 15 minutes.  The regulatory board that oversees the province’s offshore activities has said it’s now impossible to clean up the oil spill.Scott Tessier, chief executive of the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board, said no oil sheens were spotted on the water, meaning the oil has likely broken down to the point that it cannot be cleaned up.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Brands born on the internet embrace physical stores

first_imgSHORT HILLS, N.J. — A growing number of brands born on the internet, from Casper to Indochino, are opening physical stores and moving into suburban malls once considered doomed as more Americans shop online.Digital natives are discovering that it’s become more expensive to acquire customers through banner ads and email giveaways. At the same time, opening a store has become more affordable as mall vacancies force landlords to offer flexible leases and other perks. Jim Ward, who heads up recruiting for online brands for mall owner CBL, says it can be 10 times as expensive to acquire a new customer online as it is in a store.Store openings are a major shift for once online-only brands that until recently believed they didn’t need a physical presence to generate robust sales growth.Anne D’Innocenzio, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Understanding the new cannabis legislation as it pertains to youth

first_imgThe RCMP say there are two pieces of legislation at play, the B.C. Cannabis Control and Licensing Act as well as the Federal Cannabis Act.“Both have been put in place to protect children and youth and to promote health and safety for all who chose to possess and consume cannabis.  To enforce the protection of youth and their physical and mental wellbeing, police and courts across Canada have been provided new powers to issues fines and jail terms that previously did not exist.”Police are reminding youth that they have the power to issue tickets for underaged pot uses, a power that did not previously exist.“Previously, if a youth was found with a very small amount of cannabis, regardless of age, one way for police to deal with it was what was called a No Case Seizure.  In this instance, police would seize the cannabis and have it destroyed locally; done.  But now under the new cannabis legislation, police have the power to issues tickets that previously did not exist.”The best suggestions the RCMP can give you is that you do your research on what is actually legal and what is not and the penalties associated with them.For more information on marijuana use, you can visit Health Canada’s website. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John RCMP is reminding parents and youth about the rules regarding legal marijuana use.With legalization in October, the RCMP say this is not open to everyone, particularly to youth under the legal requirement age of 19 in B.C.“Many of teens are excited about the legalization of cannabis but what they may not know or understand is that nothing has changed for those who are 18 and under… cannabis is still illegal.  And just because it is legal doesn’t mean it doesn’t impact those who are using it, especially developing teens.”last_img read more

Kenney says Legault has shaky grasp of history when it comes to

first_imgThe Canadian Press QUEBEC — Alberta Premier Jason Kenney shot back at his Quebec counterpart Monday, saying Francois Legault does not understand the history of equalization.On Sunday, Legault defended equalization against criticism from Alberta, saying the program was part of the “original deal” when Quebec entered Confederation in 1867.Kenney pointed out that the first equalization system was introduced in 1957, and the principle of equalization was included in the Constitution in 1982. Legault had said Quebec, which received $13.1 billion in equalization payments in 2019, has a right to equalization, and no province can unilaterally change the formula under which Ottawa distributes the money.He acknowledged that other premiers, whose provinces are running budget deficits, expressed unhappiness at last month’s premiers’ conference in Saskatoon.“There is something I don’t like,” Legault said. “There are premiers of rich provinces who look at Quebec and say: ‘We are sending you a big cheque. We’d rather keep the money here.’ ”In a Facebook post Monday, Kenney corrected Legault on his history and took him to task for opposing new pipelines while his province benefits from Alberta’s oil and gas wealth.“If Ottawa and other provinces want to benefit from Alberta’s resources, then they must not oppose the transport and sale of those resources,” he wrote.last_img read more

App to detect fake currency developed

first_imgKolkata: Researchers at IIT Kharagpur have developed a smartphone-based application to detect counterfeit currency and also provided solutions for industrial operations ranging from thermal power plants to nuclear radiation tracking, an official said. A group of six students from the Department of Computer Science and Engineering developed the code for a smartphone application to detecting counterfeit currency. The image processing application which can detect counterfeit currency, can be installed on smartphones and thus used by people at various points to reduce the chances of fraud, a statement said. Also Read – Centuries-old Durga Pujas continue to be hit among revellers”A user can upload a currency note image and the mobile app would verify its authenticity using 25 features extracted from the front and rear side of the currency note. In case of detection of a fake note, the user will also be notified…,” TYSS Santosh, the research leader, said. To address the issue of occupational hazard for people working in the domain of a nuclear-powered device, students were asked to develop a solution for visualising and localising a 3D radiation source along with its size, shape and orientation, given the data on spatial dosage. The 6-member student team proposed a solution based on Boltzmann Transport Equations dealing with the flow of heat in fluids from hotter regions to colder ones. The students solved the reverse Boltzmann Transport Equations using the dataset for a given area to estimate the source location. “This solution is well-suited to occupational workers carrying wearable sensors detecting radiation dose data.”last_img read more

US moves to put new tariffs on 112 bn worth of EU

first_imgLondon: The United States wants to put tariffs on $11.2 billion worth of EU goods from airplanes to Gouda cheese to olives to offset what it says are unfair European subsidies for plane maker Airbus. While the size of the tariffs is small compared with the hundreds of billions the US and China are taxing in their trade war, it suggests a breakdown in talks with the European Union over trade at a time when the economy is already slowing sharply. The US and EU have been negotiating since last year about how to avoid tariffs that President Donald Trump has wanted to impose to reduce a trade deficit with countries like Germany. The US Trade Representative’s office released late Monday a list of EU products it would tax in anticipation of a ruling by the World Trade Organization this summer. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalThe US had in 2004 complained to the WTO, which sets the rules for trade and settles disputes, that the EU was providing unfair support to Airbus. The WTO ruled in May last year that the EU had in fact provided some illegal subsidies to Airbus, hurting US manufacturer Boeing. The US expects the WTO will say this summer that it can take countermeasures to offset the EU subsidies. It will now start a consultation with industry representatives on the list of EU goods it wants to tax so that it can have a ready list. “This case has been in litigation for 14 years, and the time has come for action,” said US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. The move, while nominally following international trade rules, appears to also reflect US frustration at the slow pace of talks on trade with the EU.last_img read more

Sugar mills owe 50 mn cane farmers record 438 bn

first_imgNEW DELHI/MUMBAI: India’s money-losing sugar mills have run up a record $4.38 billion in arrears to 50 million cane farmers, who have gone unpaid for their produce for more than a year, industry and government sources said on Thursday. Years of bumper cane harvests and record sugar production have hammered domestic prices, hitting mills’ financial health to such an extent that monies owed to farmers, who form an influential voting bloc, have ballooned to an all-time high. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalFarm leaders say Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has not done enough to help them get the cash owed them. Modi’s office did not respond to an email seeking comment. “The prime minister publicly promised farmers – in 2014 and 2017 – to help them get their payments within 15 days of selling their produce to sugar mills,” said M.V. Singh, convener of the Rashtriya Kisan Mazdoor Sang, or National Forum of Farmers and Labourers. Despite the promise, Modi’s government has done little to ensure timely payments, Singh said. The unpaid dues affect growers in the key cane-producing states of Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Bihar, Punjab, Haryana and Karnataka. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostOf the $4.38 billion in unpaid dues, mills in Uttar Pradesh, India’s top cane-producing state, owe 108 billion rupees ($1.56 billion), the industry and government sources said, citing their calculations based on cane prices and the volumes bought by sugar mills. In Uttar Pradesh, top producers such as Mawana Sugars Ltd, Bajaj Hindusthan Sugar Ltd and Simbhaoli Sugars Ltd, as well as unlisted Modi Sugar Mills, Wave Industries and Yadu Sugar Ltd, owe the bulk of arrears to farmers, according to the industry and government sources. “Along with the fact that sugar prices are much below the cost of production, huge inventories worth 800 billion rupees are adversely affecting mills’ paying capacity,” said Abinash Verma, chief of the Indian Sugar Mills, the producers’ body. The high inventories are keeping domestic sugar prices depressed and increased storage costs. Mills have started losing money and are finding it difficult to pay the farmers. As cane harvests jumped, domestic sugar prices fell 20 percent over the past two years, with mills often complaining about prices falling below their production costs. “Most cane growers are barely able to scrape through and it’s sad that neither the state governments nor the Modi administration have done anything,” said Pushpendra Singh, president of the Kisan Shakti Sangh, a farmers’ association. Falling farmer incomes and job scarcity have made Modi’s re-election bid more complicated than anticipated. Out of 545 seats in India’s lower house of parliament, cane farmers are key voters in 164 of the constituencies. The government took a clutch of measures, including incentives for exports and creation of buffer stocks to help trim inventories and prop up prices so that mills can pay farmers, said a federal food ministry official who did not wish to be identified in line with government policy. The measures have yielded few results so far, giving little relief to either farmers or mills, said the sources.last_img read more

US State Department addresses Turkish issues

first_imgWASHINGTON (AA) – State Department Deputy Spokesperson Marie Harf Wednesday tackled several pressing issues on Turkey.The Deputy Spokesperson denied media reports that the US has frozen its assistance to the Syrian opposition.“Not at all. Not to my knowledge. No, our assistance continues. Ambassador Ford is on the ground meeting with them right now. That report would seem to be pretty false to me,” said Harf during the daily press briefing. Turkish daily, Hurriyet, reported that the US had halted its assistance to the opposition pending the opposition meeting certain criteria.US still concerned over CPMIEC missile dealHarf concurred with Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan that Turkey’s missile defense future was ultimately a sovereign question. She added, however, that the US is concerned by the choice of the Chinese firm, China Precision Machinery Import Export Corp. (CPMIEC), and a potential lack of interoperability with NATO missile defense systems.“We have also said, two points, that this company is currently sanctioned by the United States, and that as part of NATO and a NATO ally, it is important to have systems that are interoperable”, remarked Harf.CPMIEC is currently sanctioned by the US for alleged violations of the Iran, North Korea and Syria Nonproliferation Act.Source of Ignatius media leak still unknownThe source of a media report that alleged Turkey exposed 10 Iranians working with Mossad to Tehran is still unknown, according to Harf.“I have no information at all about who may have been sources of this kind of stuff that’s out there in the press,” said Harf.Asked whether the incident led to Congress delaying weapons transfers to Ankara, Harf said that such questions should be directed to Congress.last_img read more

34 children died in Indian relief camps since September

first_imgNEW DELHI – At least 34 children aged below 12 died in relief camps in India’s Muzaffarnagar and Shamli districts between September 7 and December 20, according to a report by a government appointed committee formed on December 13 to verify reports of deaths among children in camps.“Children have died of pneumonia, not of cold,” the principal secretary of Uttar Pradesh state, Anil Gupta, said on Friday while commenting on relief camp deaths.Pneumonia is an inflammatory condition of the lungs, usually caused by bacterial or viral infection, which primarily affects the microscopic air sacs.Noting the commitee’s conclusion that the majority of child deaths had occurred outside relief camps, Gupta said, “about ten to twelve children below the age of fifteen died in the relief camps and four kids succumbed to pneumonia.” Gupta denied that there had been medical negligence on the part of doctors at relief camps as serious cases were referred to Primary Health Care centers (PHCs) and district hospitals.Initially the state government had denied outright any deaths at Muzaffarnagar camps, even submitting an affidavit before the Supreme Court with similar claims.The Hindu-Muslim clashes in northern Indian state Uttar Pradesh which broke out on September 7 claimed 65 lives. It left 85 others wounded and rendered 51,000 people, mostly Muslims, homeless.Nearly 5,000 people are still holed up at five relief camps in the Muzaffarnagar and Shamli districts, with almost 2,000 in Loi relief camp alone. Around 2,000 others are in Malakpur.last_img read more

Nelson Mandela to be honored at 20th Fes Festival of World

first_imgFez – The 20th Fes festival of the world sacred music, to be held from next June 13 to 21 will pay tribute to Nelson Mandela, the first African president of post-apartheid south Africa who passed away lately at 95.This year’s festival, themed, “conference of birds, when cultures travel ” will feature a much-awaited concert of Youssou Ndour and Johnny Clegg in the mythical Bab Makina square.Youssou Ndour is Senegalese singer, percussionist, songwriter, composer, occasional actor, businessman and a politician. In 2004, Rolling Stone described him as, “perhaps the most famous singer alive” in Senegal and much of Africa. He has been holding since 1985 a mega concert in Dakar for the release of Mandela. Johnny Clegg has always linked his music to the anti-apartheid struggle.The famous Fes Forum will debate aspects of Mandela’s personality as a militant and politician. The African leader will also be present in the Batha museum for a debate titled “Is a Mandela possible in the Middle east?”last_img read more

180 Million Cost of the New American Embassy in Rabat

Rabat- Built on 16,000 square meters of which 3,500 covered, the new US embassy in Rabat has reportedly required a total investment of $180 million. The new premises will be officially inaugurated around November 20th by the US Vice President Joe Biden and another top official whose identity has not yet been revealed, according to Le 360 website.“The land on which the embassy was built belongs to the US government. It was offered by the late king Hassan II to the United States in 1978,” says Aziz Younes, an American diplomat of Lebanese descent. He is also the head of project whose work began in February 2012 in the presence of the then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her Moroccan counterpart Saad Eddine El Othmani at the time Minister of Foreign Affairs. “The new premises have been designed to be eco-friendly, with the installation of a water recycling unit and a solar energy supply up to 35% of total consumption, said the U.S. official.“The embassy has the most sophisticated and modern protection systems and security surveillance. The chancery was built on the model of those of Pakistan and Jakarta in Indonesia,” he added. © Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributed. read more