More than half of disabled people who have tried t

first_imgMore than half of disabled people who have tried to buy tickets for live music events have had to call premium-rate phone numbers to arrange access, according to a new survey.Four-fifths of those surveyed said they had experienced problems with booking access alongside their ticket, while nearly three-quarters said such barriers had been discriminatory.The results of the national online survey were published by the user-led music charity Attitude is Everything (AiE) as part of its fourth State of Access Report on the live music industry.Of the 53 per cent who said they had been forced to use premium rate phone lines to book access, several reported that this had cost them more than £20 in phone charges.Although the survey results cannot be directly compared – because they were obtained through different methods – they do appear to show an improvement since a survey of AiE mystery shoppers in 2014 found 95 per cent of respondents had experienced problems when booking access and 88 per cent said they had felt discriminated against.This year’s State of Access Report focuses on problems associated with booking tickets for live music events.Publishing the report, the charity also launched a new taskforce, the Ticketing Without Barriers Coalition, which aims to address five key problems encountered by Deaf and disabled live music fans when booking tickets.The pan-industry group includes more than 35 trade bodies, ticketing agencies, event promoters and venues, including UK Music, PRS for Music, Ticketmaster, Festival Republic and Live Nation.The areas the coalition will address include: the need for a single proof-of-disability system that is uniformly recognised and accepted across the UK; all venues and events to provide quality online information about access; more choice and flexibility when booking tickets for fans with access requirements; and a more dependable system for managing access bookings.The coalition will also target the need for “equal access”, so that disabled fans can book access for pre-sales of tickets, VIP and artist meet-up tickets, and when using entertainment gift cards; can resell accessible seats; are not charged to use access booking lines; and can easily book tickets for a personal assistant if they need one.The report concludes that access across the live music industry “remains a mixed picture”.It adds: “Many venues and events have moved beyond basic reasonable adjustments to improve access for customers in impressively creative and collaborative ways.“On the other hand, there are venue and event organisers now being left behind as they continue to enact outdated and potentially discriminatory policies that impact the ability of Deaf and disabled people to access the paid-for services they provide.”Suzanne Bull (pictured), AiE’s chief executive and the government’s disability sector champion for music, said: “Although there has been much progress in making the ticketing process accessible and inclusive, and certain venues and companies are definitely getting this right for their Deaf and disabled customers, we felt that only a comprehensive and truly unified approach would be able to drive through the real and lasting changes that we need. “In 2018, every large-scale music event should be all-inclusive.“Disabled customers should be able to buy a ticket online, they should be encouraged to attend shows with their friends, and not have to jump through undignified hoops when things go wrong.”Sarah Newton, minister for disabled people, said: “Going to a gig or festival is an experience that everyone should be able to enjoy.“It’s therefore incredibly important that disabled people have the right access when booking tickets for live music events, which is why I’m really pleased to see leading businesses from across the music industry coming together to improve accessibility. “We know that disabled people and their households have a combined spending power of £249 billion a year, proving that being inclusive isn’t just the right thing to do, it also makes good business sense.”AiE also announced that it will convene a new cross-sector group that will “exchange ideas and unite around common principles when it comes to accessibility”, across music, cinema, theatre, heritage and sport, and will focus on issues such as the provision of access information, providing evidence of access requirements, and implementing access bookings.Organisations that have already pledged to join the group include Arts Council England, Shape Arts, Level Playing Field, UK Theatre and the Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers.Picture by Joanna Dudderidgelast_img read more

STARTERS ORDERS Tuesday

first_imgWelcome to Starters Orders. Our new daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Tuesday 2 July3.30 HamiltonGrandiloquent we ducked the early 16 – laid at 12 and now 5 (25p rule 4 on early bets)5.50 Gowran ParkHarpist 2/1 > 6/46.00 BathBrunhilde 9/4 > 6/4last_img

Premier violin and piano professors join Rice

first_imgAddThis PAUL KANTORVIRGINIAWECKSTROM ShareDavid [email protected] violin and piano professors join Rice’s Shepherd School of MusicKantor and Weckstrom to join faculty in 2012Two of the country’s premier teaching musicians are joining Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music. Paul Kantor, currently the Eleanor H. Biggs Memorial Distinguished Professor of Violin at the Cleveland Institute of Music (CIM), and Virginia (Ginny) Weckstrom, a member of the chamber music and collaborative piano faculty at CIM, will join Rice in July 2012. The two have been married for 30 years.“Paul Kantor is widely recognized as one of America’s leading violin pedagogues,” said Robert Yekovich, dean of the Shepherd School. “His appointment to the violin faculty at the Shepherd School adds a special luster. It also reaffirms the school’s commitment to sustaining the extremely high quality of its program and fine reputation as a top-ranked music institution.” Kantor, who will become the Sallie Shepherd Perkins Professor of Violin, joined the Cleveland Institute in 2002. His impressive musical career includes serving as chair of the String Department at the University of Michigan for 13 years. Prior to that he held concurrent appointments on the faculties of The Juilliard School, the New England Conservatory and Yale University. For the past 32 years he has been an artist and faculty member of the Aspen Music Festival and School, where he was concertmaster of both the Festival Orchestra and Chamber Symphony.“I am both professionally and personally thrilled to learn that Paul and Ginny will be joining the Shepherd School community and I know that my sentiments are shared by my colleagues, many of whom have already had the good fortune of collaborating with them in the past,” said Kathleen Winkler, professor of violin and The Dorothy Richard Starling Chair in Classical Violin. “They are two of the most esteemed pedagogues and performers in their respective areas, and their addition to our faculty will further solidify the Shepherd School’s standing as one of the finest music schools in the world.”Over the years, Kantor has visited and taught at Rice, but his and Weckstrom’s last visit to campus played an important role in their decision to join Rice.“We were made to feel so welcomed … from the dean’s assistant to our colleagues in every department we met with, and certainly with Dean Yekovich,” Kantor said. “The excellence of the Shepherd School is so well known, and I am struck by the appreciation and affection the graduates have for Rice and the education they received, as well as the internal respect which seems prevalent between all constituencies at the school.”Weckstrom will join the Shepherd School as an Artist Teacher of Piano Chamber Music and Accompanying. Prior to joining the Cleveland Institute in 2003, Weckstrom had taught piano since 1989 at the Residential College of the University of Michigan, where she directed the chamber music program for the last four years. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree with honors from the Western College for Women and a Master of Music degree from the Yale School of Music. Weckstrom also served as chair of the Piano Department at the Neighborhood Music School in New Haven, Conn., and was a founder of the School for Performing Arts in Ann Arbor.“The graduate program in Piano Chamber Music and Accompanying, directed by Brian Connelly, is a small, highly selective program,” Yekovich said. “With the addition of Virginia Weckstrom and her vast amount of experience in this particular area, the program is now poised to make important strides forward. Her appointment will ideally complement the fine work already being done by Brian and Jeanne Kierman Fischer.” “I’m welcoming this new adventure,” Weckstrom said. ”Houston seems like a beautiful, cosmopolitan city. When I have students, I don’t just have a musical relationship with them, but I have a life-long friendship. I recently gave a concert with my teacher and mentor from my undergraduate years. She’s 90 years old and I still treasure that relationship. I would hope to have those types of friendships with the students I teach too.”Kantor and Weckstrom have two adult children, Gwendolyn and Timothy. The Shepherd School of Music is ranked one of the country’s best musical schools. Graduates can be found in orchestras around the globe, including the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, the San Francisco and Chicago symphonies, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and the Orchestre National de France, and opera graduates have sung in several of the world’s most prestigious opera houses and recital halls.To learn more about the Shepherd School of Music, visit www.music.rice.edu. Long DescriptionLong Description last_img read more

Hybrid ribbons a gift for powerful batteries

first_imgShareDavid [email protected] [email protected] ribbons a gift for powerful batteriesRice lab finds vanadium oxide/graphene material works well for lithium-ion storageHOUSTON — (March 25, 2013) — Hybrid ribbons of vanadium oxide (VO2) and graphene may accelerate the development of high-power lithium-ion batteries suitable for electric cars and other demanding applications.The Rice University lab of materials scientist Pulickel Ajayan determined that the well-studied material is a superior cathode for batteries that could supply both high energy density and significant power density. The research appears online this month in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters.The ribbons created at Rice are thousands of times thinner than a sheet of paper, yet have potential that far outweighs current materials for their ability to charge and discharge very quickly. Cathodes built into half-cells for testing at Rice fully charged and discharged in 20 seconds and retained more than 90 percent of their initial capacity after more than 1,000 cycles.“This is the direction battery research is going, not only for something with high energy density but also high power density,” Ajayan said. “It’s somewhere between a battery and a supercapacitor.”The ribbons also have the advantage of using relatively abundant and cheap materials. “This is done through a very simple hydrothermal process, and I think it would be easily scalable to large quantities,” he said.Ajayan said vanadium oxide has long been considered a material with great potential, and in fact vanadium pentoxide has been used in lithium-ion batteries for its special structure and high capacity. But oxides are slow to charge and discharge, due to their low electrical conductivity. The high-conductivity graphene lattice that is literally baked in solves that problem nicely, he said, by serving as a speedy conduit for electrons and channels for ions.The atom-thin graphene sheets bound to the crystals take up very little bulk. In the best samples made at Rice, fully 84 percent of the cathode’s weight was the lithium-slurping VO2, which held 204 milliamp hours of energy per gram. The researchers, led by Rice graduate student Yongji Gong and lead author Shubin Yang, said they believe that to be among the best overall performance ever seen for lithium-ion battery electrodes.“One challenge to production was controlling the conditions for the co-synthesis of VO2 ribbons with graphene,” Yang said. The process involved suspending graphene oxide nanosheets with powdered vanadium pentoxide (layered vanadium oxide, with two atoms of vanadium and five of oxygen) in water and heating it in an autoclave for hours. The vanadium pentoxide was completely reduced to VO2, which crystallized into ribbons, while the graphene oxide was reduced to graphene, Yang said. The ribbons, with a web-like coating of graphene, were only about 10 nanometers thick, up to 600 nanometers wide and tens of micrometers in length.“These ribbons were the building blocks of the three-dimensional architecture,” Yang said. “This unique structure was favorable for the ultrafast diffusion of both lithium ions and electrons during charge and discharge processes. It was the key to the achievement of excellent electrochemical performance.”In testing the new material, Yang and Gong found its capacity for lithium storage remained stable after 200 cycles even at high temperatures (167 degrees Fahrenheit) at which other cathodes commonly decay, even at low charge-discharge rates.“We think this is real progress in the development of cathode materials for high-power lithium-ion batteries,” Ajayan said, suggesting the ribbons’ ability to be dispersed in a solvent might make them suitable as a component in the paintable batteries developed in his lab.Co-authors of the new paper are Rice graduate students Daniel Hashim and Lulu Ma; research scientist Zheng Liu; former Rice visiting researcher Liang Zhan, now an associate professor at East China University of Science and Technology in Shanghai; and faculty fellow Robert Vajtai. Ajayan is the Benjamin M. and Mary Greenwood Anderson Professor in Engineering and a professor of mechanical engineering and materials science, chemistry, and chemical and biomolecular engineering.The work was funded by the U.S. Army Research Office and the Office of Naval Research through a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative grant and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship grant.-30-Read the abstract at https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2023/IMG17910.jpg” alt=”last_img” /> read more

Nanocoating makes coaxial cables lighter

first_imgShare1Editor’s note: Links to images for download appear at the end of this release.David [email protected] [email protected] makes coaxial cables lighterRice University scientists replace metal with carbon nanotubes for aerospace use HOUSTON – (Jan. 27, 2016) – Common coaxial cables could be made 50 percent lighter with a new nanotube-based outer conductor developed by Rice University scientists.The Rice lab of Professor Matteo Pasquali has developed a coating that could replace the tin-coated copper braid that transmits the signal and shields the cable from electromagnetic interference. The metal braid is the heaviest component in modern coaxial data cables.The research appears this month in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.Replacing the outer conductor with Rice’s flexible, high-performance coating would benefit airplanes and spacecraft, in which the weight and strength of data-carrying cables are significant factors in performance.Rice research scientist Francesca Mirri, lead author of the paper, made three versions of the new cable by varying the carbon-nanotube thickness of the coating. She found that the thickest, about 90 microns – approximately the width of the average human hair – met military-grade standards for shielding and was also the most robust; it handled 10,000 bending cycles with no detrimental effect on the cable performance.“Current coaxial cables have to use a thick metal braid to meet the mechanical requirements and appropriate conductance,” Mirri said. “Our cable meets military standards, but we’re able to supply the strength and flexibility without the bulk.”Coaxial cables consist of four elements: a conductive copper core, an electrically insulating polymer sheath, an outer conductor and a polymer jacket. The Rice lab replaced only the outer conductor by coating sheathed cores with a solution of carbon nanotubes in chlorosulfonic acid. Compared with earlier attempts to use carbon nanotubes in cables, this method yields a more uniform conductor and has higher throughput, Pasquali said. “This is one of the few cases where you can have your cake and eat it, too,” he said. “We obtained better processing and improved performance.”Replacing the braided metal conductor with the nanotube coating eliminated 97 percent of the component’s mass, Mirri said.She said the lab is working on a method to scale up production. The lab is drawing on its experience in producing high-performance nanotube-based fibers.“It’s a very similar process,” Mirri said. “We just need to substitute the exit of the fiber extrusion setup with a wire-coating die. These are high-throughput processes currently used in the polymer industry to make a lot of commercial products. The Air Force seems very interested in this technology, and we are currently working on a Small Business Innovation Research project with the Air Force Research Laboratory to see how far we can take it.”Co-authors are graduate students Robert Headrick and Amram Bengio and alumni April Choi and Yimin Luo, all of Rice; Nathan Orloff, Aaron Forster, Angela Hight Walker, Paul Butler and Kalman Migler of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Rana Ashkar of NIST, the University of Maryland and Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and Christian Long of NIST and the University of Maryland.Pasquali is the A.J. Hartsook Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, chair of the Department of Chemistry and a professor of materials science and nanoengineering and of chemistry.The research was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Air Force Research Laboratories, the Robert A. Welch Foundation, NIST, the National Science Foundation and a NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship.-30-Read the abstract at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsami.5b11600Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated Materials:Complex Flows of Complex Fluids (Pasquali Lab): https://pasquali.rice.edu/home/Wiess School of Natural Sciences: http://naturalsciences.rice.eduVideo: Spinning nanotube fibers at Rice University: https://youtu.be/4XDJC64tDR0Images for download: AddThis http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/0201_COAXIAL-1-WEB.jpgRice University research scientist Francesca Mirri holds a standard coaxial data cable (bottom) and a new cable with an outer conductor of carbon nanotubes. Replacing the braided metal outer conductor with a conductive nanotube coating makes the cable 50 percent lighter, Mirri said. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/0201_COAXIAL-3-web.jpgReplacing the braided outer conductor in coaxial data cables with a coat of conductive carbon nanotubes saves significant weight, according to Rice University researchers. (Credit: Pasquali Lab/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,910 undergraduates and 2,809 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for best quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/AboutRiceUniversity. http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/0201_COAXIAL-2-WEB.jpgA coating of carbon nanotubes, seen through a clear jacket, replaces a braided metal outer conductor in an otherwise standard coaxial data cable. Rice University scientists designed the cable to save weight for aerospace applications. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)last_img read more

Rices Glasscock School Texas Tribune to host The Federal Response to Harvey

first_imgAddThis Share2MEDIA ADVISORYJeff [email protected]’s Glasscock School, Texas Tribune to host ‘The Federal Response to Harvey: One Year Later’ Aug. 30HOUSTON – (Aug. 13, 2018) – Rice University’s Glasscock School of Continuing Studies will host a Texas Tribune conversation Aug. 30 about the federal response to Hurricane Harvey one year after the storm made landfall in Texas. Panelists from federal, state and local government will discuss the status of recovery and the long-term plans for getting neighborhoods and towns back on their feet.Courtesy of Texas TribuneThe event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.Who: Panelists George P. Bush, Texas land commissioner; Traci Brasher, recovery division director for FEMA Region 6; Marvin Odum, chief recovery officer for the city of Houston; and Beth Van Duyne, regional administrator for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.Brandon Formby, urban affairs reporter for the Texas Tribune, will serve as moderator.David Leebron, president of Rice, and Robert Bruce, dean of the Glasscock School, will give welcoming remarks.What: A panel discussion titled “The Federal Response to Harvey: One Year Later.” An audience Q&A will follow.When: Thursday, Aug. 30, noon-1 p.m. Registration and a light lunch will begin at 11:30 a.m.Where: Rice University, Anderson-Clarke Center, Hudspeth Auditorium, 6100 Main St. Paid visitor parking is available in West Lots 4 and 5, located adjacent to the Anderson-Clarke Center. For a map of Rice’s campus with parking information, go to www.rice.edu/maps.The public must RSVP for the event at www.eventbrite.com/e/the-federal-response-to-harvey-one-year-later-registration-48847890355. A live webcast will be available at https://www.texastribune.org/events.Members of the news media who want to attend should RSVP to Jeff Falk, associate director of national media relations at Rice, at [email protected] or 713-348-6775.Related information:Hurricane Harvey Registry: The Hurricane Harvey Registry (HHR) is collecting information on Hurricane Harvey’s impact on the Greater Houston community in order to direct recovery efforts and plan for the future. The HHR is a joint venture of the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), Fort Bend County, the Harris County Public Health Department, the Houston Health Department, Montgomery County and Rice University. It is is funded by the EDF, the Cullen Trust for Health Care and the National Institutes of Health. People can help the region recover by taking the HHR survey, whether Harvey impacted them severely, lightly or not at all.Course on Hurricane Harvey: The Glasscock School is offering a new course this fall, After the Flood: Lessons from Hurricane Harvey, which considers the Houston region’s vulnerability to extreme weather and the extraordinary efforts to rebuild lives and communities in the wake of Harvey. Scientists, engineers, architects, urban planners and others share innovative design, engineering, social, environmental, economic and policy strategies that may help Houston and other cities around the globe become more resilient to future storms. Information about the course agenda is available here.-30-Follow the Glasscock School via Twitter @GlasscockSchool.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,970 undergraduates and 2,934 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for happiest students by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2023/IMG17645.jpg” alt=”last_img” /> read more

City of Redmond Forest Service Partner to Provide Support to Wildland Firefighting

first_imgCity of Redmond & Forest Service Partner to Provide Support to Wildland Firefighting Agencies LinkedIn By CBN on March 5, 2015 Share. 0 Email Twittercenter_img E-Headlines Pinterest The City of Redmond and the Forest Service have completed several important steps to continue partnering to provide wildland firefighting support services at the Redmond Air Center located at the Redmond Airport. Recently the City of Redmond and Forest Service completed a new 10-year land lease for the 51 acres that the Redmond Air Center sits on following the expiration of the Center’s original 50-year lease.“Extending this longstanding partnership with the USFS has been a high priority for the Mayor and Council – it’s good for the economy and good for the community,” states Keith Witcosky, Redmond city manager.In addition the City of Redmond and the Forest Service completed a new 10-year lease agreement for the Redmond Air Center Cache II. The Redmond Air Center Cache II is part of the Air Center that provides wildland firefighting supplies to all wildland firefighting government agencies throughout the Pacific Northwest as well as other parts of the nation.“We are very pleased to have these new leases in place and to work in partnership with the City of Redmond and the Redmond Airport to maintain this critical firefighting support to the nation, “said John Allen, forest supervisor, Deschutes National Forest.The Redmond Air Center, which celebrated its 50th Anniversary at the Redmond Airport last year, services Federal, State and local wildland fire management agencies. The Redmond Air Center also supports and manages national shared resources, including smokejumpers, air tankers, an Interagency Hotshot crew and a training center. The Redmond Air Center also acts as a Regional and National Incident Mobilization Center (crews, engines, and heavy equipment) and host the Regional Aviation Group (RAG). Tumblr Facebook Google+last_img read more

Women in NYC Tech Madeline Fedorova of Anxiety Reliever

first_img Filed Under: #NYCTech, AlleyTalk, Interviews, Techs and the City Women in NYC Tech: Madeline Fedorova of Anxiety RelieverJune 14, 2018 by AlleyWatch 307SHARESFacebookTwitterLinkedin The team at AlleyWatch believes it’s important to have an inclusive discussion around the challenges facing women in tech along with highlighting the work of the female entrepreneurs that have made NYC one of the best places for women in tech according to some recent studies. That’s why we are running this series that showcases women in tech in New York.If you are a female founder in NYC working in tech and interested in participating in the series please visit this link or click on the image above.Please feel free to pass this on to any women in NYC that you feel should be considered for the series. Thank you.PREVIOUS POSTNEXT POSTcenter_img Are you a woman in NYC Tech and interested in participating in this series? Make sure to read the whole article…Much has been said and written about the lack of women in the tech sector, be it as investors (or associates), founders, or in management positions at major companies. Is the problem the old boys network – or that success in technology is seen as a young man’s game? In this series, we speak with some of the top women in tech in New York as they discuss the challenges they face, the perceptions that need to be changed and the work that’s being done – or not – to help to promote women in tech.Today we sit down with Madeline Fedorova, the CEO and Founder of the app Anxiety Reliever. At a crossroads in her life, Madeline made the bold decision to drop out of the California Institute of the Arts Film School to pursue her lifelong passion for technology. Since then, Anxiety Reliever has received acclaim from a number of notable publications. She recently moved to New York to expand her company and further her mission of combining wellness and technology to help improve peoples’ lives.AlleyWatch got the chance to speak to Madeline about what it is like being a young female entrepreneur and how she is navigating the New York tech ecosystem.Madeline Fedorova of Anxiety Reliever What’s your background and how did you develop your career as a female entrepreneur in the NYC tech ecosystem?In 2014, I got accepted to California Institute of the Arts to study filmmaking but during the same time the idea of creating an app to help people suffering from anxiety came to me, so I’ve decided to drop out of college to pursue my passion which has always been tech. That crucial decision led me to be where I’m today.When it comes to developing my career here, I always want to do more and actively contribute to the NYC tech ecosystem. Since I just moved here recently, it feels like I’m just getting started.What can be done to further promote female entrepreneurs and women in tech in New York?The stories of women and how they’ve built their businesses should be highlighted more often. That will help to inspire and encourage others to join the space. From the readers’ perspective, I think interviews like these help a ton. At the end of the day, each person needs to come to a decision on their own if they want to join the tech space. My advice would be to give yourself a chance to venture out and tackle complex problems. The fear of failure will never lead you anywhere exciting and thrilling.What is diversity to you and do you see it evolving in tech?For me, diversity is where everyone is included and accepted. Where everybody is welcomed and have the same pool of resources. I do see it happening in tech however the pace could be way quicker. The good news is that change is in our hands, by welcoming diversity within our companies or entering sectors where there is a lack of it that’s how we bring real change.Why do you think it’s important that women retain, grow, and develop into senior roles within their organizations? It doesn’t and shouldn’t matter what gender you’re if you’re a leader and great at your job then it’s all that matters. People should be valued based on what they are bringing to the company not based on any discriminating factors. There should be equal opportunity for both women and men to grow and develop into senior roles and it’s up to us as employers to be fair and promote or hire based on how good of an employee that person is and not gender!It’s statically proven that women-led companies are more successful than their male counterparts. Why do you think they still only get 2% of the funding available for new ideas?There is a gap between the number of male and female founders. The tech space is in need of more females. I think the more women entrepreneurs there will be, the harder it will be to ignore us. When it comes to venture capital, I see quite a few women becoming investors and holding positions of power which is exciting.I’m currently in the process of looking for funding as well, so we’ll see how it goes. It’s quite mind-boggling to me why this percentage is so small, but I hope it will drastically grow in the years to come.NYC has been named one of the best places for women in tech. You moved your company from Florida. What are your thoughts on the tech ecosystem here? Is it more inclusive?I absolutely love the tech ecosystem in NYC. Everyone that I’ve met was really helpful, supportive and excited about what each person is building. There are way more opportunities here in New York than in Florida. However, I do wish there would be more interesting events where the startup community would come together and learn from each other. Therefore, I’ve decided to start hosting tech events.Please tell us about a few organizations that you are involved with or respect that are promoting women in tech.I would love to join an organization that is truly making a difference in women’s lives, but I don’t know any. So, if you’re reading this and familiar with an organization that I should know about, please reach out to me, I would be very grateful. I’m interested in helping out by mentoring and supporting in ways that I can.On my own, I started to organize tech networking events to bring people together and I do my best to reach out to an equal number of women and men.How much do you think casual sexual harassment and misconduct affects a woman’s career? There are a lot of women out there who are just silent about it because they are afraid of what speaking out might mean for them. Some are afraid of being judged or losing a job, but if you look underneath the surface everything is based on fear. Once you face your fear, you’ll feel liberated. Women who are facing any type of misconduct should not put themselves down and allow that behavior to continue. Say something! Don’t keep living your life trying to ignore that because if you do, this will never change. You are never less than anyone else, you have as much power as any guy, you just need to stop giving it away.What can men do to support this movement and/or participate in this discussion?The best thing both men and women can do is to care, be very vocal and take action against sexual harassment, discrimination, and misconduct. Whether you see it happening at work, at the grocery store or on the street, say something, don’t ignore it. Women and men are together in this. It’s time we start to welcome unity, rather than separation.last_img read more

How to Supercharge Your Most Important Relationships

first_img Filed Under: Advice, Management, Resources, Strategic How to Supercharge Your Most Important RelationshipsOctober 22, 2018 by Mo Bunnell 225SHARESFacebookTwitterLinkedin Ten years from now, your future self is yelling, telling you to do something now, telling you to focus on the most important thing to your future self’s success—investing in your most important relationships.Your future self can see it clearly. Relationships are at the core of your future success. Some people let the universe determine who they know, who they will know, and how quickly the connections will be created. Others work a process, always moving incrementally ahead, one week at a time. Can you guess who has more success?Think about the people who have made the greatest impact on your business and career trajectory so far. Not just the great, happy clients—what about the investor who wrote the first check in the angel round? The well-placed influencer who routinely steers business your way? Some people out there are looking out for you and, if they’re in the right position, can have a truly supercharged effect. What do all these people have in common? Why do they like you so much that they’re willing to go out of their way to help you succeed? For most people these relationships form mysteriously—things either click or they don’t. In reality, we have far more agency over our relationships than we think. You can create these supercharged relationships. It just takes focus. The Protemoi List  So where do you focus your efforts? On your best clients? Your unhappiest ones? The people with the fanciest job titles? The people who actually say yes when you invite them to lunch?The correct answer is: the people on your Protemoi List.Protemoi (pro΄-tuh-moy) is Greek for “first among equals.” Your Protemoi List will help you invest in your most important relationships, whether you are actively working with them or not. Ultimately some people are more important to your success than others—your long-term success depends on this group. The Protemoi List captures those names and keeps them front of mind. Practicality Break: Pull out a pen and piece of paper (or open a new tab in your browser and bring up a Google Doc) and start writing down the names of the top seven to ten people who you think should be on your Protemoi List. Who could have the biggest impact on your business and career? Most high-level professionals will tell you that relationships are the most important contributor to success, yet they don’t systematically prioritize and invest in them. All too often they just try to juggle this stuff in their heads. Guilty of this yourself? You’re driving to work when you suddenly think, “I need to email Karim!” Then something comes up, and the email never gets sent. Five years go by, and Karim is named CEO. Now it looks pretty cheesy to email him. “Hey, remember me? The person who didn’t keep in touch? Uh, I just saw you’re now in a buying position at a client of mine. Want to go have lunch so I can tell you about what we do?”There’s a better way.Adding Value With Every InteractionNow that our most important relationships are lined up and ready to go, what’s next? The Protemoi List is half the equation, but we need more. We want to make it easy for you to sustainably and systematically create positive experiences for each of your Protemoi people. In other words, make it easy for you to add value with every interaction.Value can take many forms—a business book suggestion, an introduction to someone in your network, a link to the video of a relevant talk, an invitation to brainstorm on a problem they’re having over coffee. When you add value to an interaction through a tangible item like this, we call it an Asset.Waiting for inspiration to strike before you reach out to the people on your Protemoi List doesn’t work. You’ll waste your time researching for something to send—digging instead of doing. This part of the process needs to be as systematic at first, so you can build and sustain the habit. The most effective way to do this is to maintain an Asset List, a list of items you always have at hand to quickly send your Protemoi contacts to create easy positive experiences.Assets can be anything helpful or interesting to your Protemoi people. Although many people think of business items first, anything that adds value can work great, like information on hobbies, sports teams, and workout advice. Here, specificity is key. You can’t write down “workout advice” because it won’t spark a connection with who would enjoy what. Instead, you need the specific YouTube link to some great new drills improving your cuts for playing Ultimate Frisbee. That specific asset cries out for the specific people on your Protemoi List that would love it.Practicality Break: Take out that pen and paper again (or reopen that Google Doc) and start taking stock of all the interesting articles, books, videos, and people you love. Start creating your Asset List.When you diligently maintain your Asset List providing value to your Protemoi people will take only a moment’s browsing. Add ideas now to get things started, but after that, simply leave your list open during the day and get in the habit of adding to it as items pop up.  Your Asset List will contain links to anything interesting: videos, books, articles or even people via their LinkedIn profile. Sometimes a document or spreadsheet won’t suffice. Personally, I use the cross-platform application Pocket to store my Asset List, but many software tools have similar features, from Google Keep to Evernote, with more options appearing every day. Choose one that suits you, your platform, and your working style. The key is to keep capturing. Your ability to add value to the lives of those on your Protemoi List drastically improves when you start diligently capturing assets. If it’s cool, capture it!The people on your Protemoi List can have a supercharged impact on your business and success. It’s your responsibility to invest in them. Life will try to steer you away, but you can steer it back. You’ve got people you can be helpful to right now. You’ve got Assets ready to go. They’re waiting. Start with one outreach. Get going.Now you’ve turned the key and cranked up your supercharged, value-adding machine. It’s fun. You’ll enjoy the process, and so will each recipient.Oh, and your future-self enjoyed your new approach immensely and has calmed down. Basking in all your success to come, your future self is taking a well-deserved nap.PREVIOUS POSTNEXT POSTlast_img read more

Duracell Powerpack

first_imgBrian Norton, Manager of Clinical Assistive Technology at Easter Seals Crossroads shows you how to use a Duracell Powerpack to power Assistive Technology devices if there is not a power source.Share this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedMonday Tech Tip: Duracell Powerpack and Assistive TechnologyDecember 16, 2013In “Videos”Missouri Assistive Technology ConferenceFebruary 26, 2010In “Conferences and Events”Glow In The Dark GripperOctober 22, 2013In “Products and Devices”last_img read more

Top 10 Tips for Buying Toys for Kids with Special Needs and

first_img5.Current Popularity –Is it a toy that will help the child with special needs feel like “any other kid”? Does it tie in with other activities, like books and art sets that promote other forms of play? An example of a toy that meets these criteria is the Kurio 7s Android Family Tablet. This wi-fi enabled tablet has an HD video player, music player, e-book reader, camera and more. It has over 60 education games and apps preloaded and parental controls. This toy is great for kids who want to have a tablet but need more parental control. Lekotek partnered with Toys R Us to make this guide and prepared theirTop Ten Tips for Buying Toys 1.Multi-Sensory Appeal– Does the toy respond with lights, sounds or movement to engage the child? Are there contrasting colors? Does it have a scent? Is there texture? An example of a toy that meets these criteria would be the Orbeez Luxury Spa. This is pedicure spa that has warm and vibrating Orbeez balls with LED lights to massage a child’s feet. This toy will stimulate kids with the lights and the texture of the massage balls. 8.Child’s Individual Abilities– Does the toy provide activities that reflect both developmental and chronological ages? Does it reflect the child’s interests? An example of a toy that meets these criteria is the Leap Frog Kindergarten Learning Kit, which provides essential activities to prepare a child for kindergarten such as beginning math and reading skills. The creative activities reinforce early education objectives and offers a fun learning experience. 3.Places the Toy Will Be Used- Will the toy be easy to store? Is there space in the home? Can the toy be used in a variety of positions such as side-lying or on a wheelchair tray? An example of a toy that meets these criteria is the Design and Drill Activity Center, which allows kids to create their own designs on activity cards using power drill and screwdrivers. This toy encourages hand-eye coordination and pattern recognition. Toys R Us publishes a wonderful toy guide, Toys R Us Toy Guide for Differently-Abled Kids, that helps parents pick out gifts for kids with special needs. Their goal is to help people find the right gift based on a child’s ability and identify toys that will stimulate them and promote development. The guide lists the toys with a symbol next to them that identifies the skill-building categories. These categories are: auditory, creativity, fine motor, gross motor, language, self-esteem, social skills, tactile, thinking, and visual. These toys have at least two or more symbols that help people identify toys that will build or reinforce a particular skill. There is also a helpful toy finder index that is divided into the above skill-building categories, with a list of all the toys that are recommended for that skill. This is their 20th year providing this toy guide.This resource guide was put together to help people determine toys based on a child’s individual needs and these toy recommendations were selected by the National Lekotek Center. The National Lekotek Center is a not-for-profit organization that offers many services to kids with special needs using toys and play to learn, develop and interact with others. As part of their services they offer AblePlay Product Evaluation and Rating System to evaluate toys and provide product information about the products ability to help kids with special needs. They research toys with the goal of making play accessible for children of any ability. They identify toys that assist in development in kids that have physical, cognitive or developmental disabilities. 10.Potential for Interaction– Will the child be an active participant during use? Will the toy encourage social engagement with others? An example of a toy that meets these criteria is the Hedbanz Act Up! Game. This is a game where players wear a headband and place cards with words on it. The other player then acts out the clue to get you to guess your card. This is a great game to get kids to interact with others. The game is for 2-6 players. 6.Self-Expression-Does the toy allow for creativity, uniqueness and making choices? Will it give the child experience with a variety of media? An example of a toy that meets these criteria is the Melissa & Doug Musical Instrument Set. This set includes a tambourine, cymbals, maracas, kazoo, tone block and stick and a triangle. This toy is great for letting kids express their individuality through music. 9.Safety and Durability– Does the toy fit with the child’s size and strength? Does it have moisture resistance? Is the toy and it’s parts sized appropriately? Can it be washed and cleaned? An example of a toy that meets these criteria is the Oball. The Oball is a 4 inch bendable ball. This ball has a smooth design with large finger holes that make it safe and easy to catch. 7.Adjustability– Does the toy have adjustable height, sound volume, speed and level of difficulty? An example of a toy that meets these criteria is the Fisher-Price Grow 2 Pro Junior Basketball Set. This basketball goal grows with your child. It has a large basket, which makes it easy for them to score a goal and then you can eventually adjust the height and rim to be smaller to provide additional challenges as they grow. 2.Method of Activation- Will the toy provide a challenge without frustration? What is the force required to activate? What are the number and complexity of steps required to activate? An example of a toy that meets these criteria would be Hot Dots Jr. This toy has lesson cards that have early learning skills such as colors, patterns, numbers and more. It is a self-checking electronic quiz that has a hot dots power pen. A child touches the pen to the dot to answer and it responds instantly with four positive rewards sound and will give a “boing” for an incorrect answer. This toy helps kids get ready for school. 4.Opportunities for Success– Can play be open-ended with no definite right or wrong way? Is it adaptable to the child’s individual style, ability and pace? An example of a toy that meets these criteria is the Imaginarium Connect and Create Tub. This tub has 70 colorful building pieces with rotating parts that kids can stack and link to create things. This toy is great for creative play. Toys R Us Toy Guide is a great resource for anyone buying gifts for a child with special needs. This guide will help you find toys that will encourage kids to grow, achieve and interact with others. This booklet is also available online at: www.ToysRUs.com/DifferentlyAbled.The INDATA Project hosts 5 FREE full day trainings per year and this past year we were fortunate to have Lekotek provide a training on Making Play Accessible. Those trainings are archived and you can click here to view that full day training.  Click here if you are interested in joining our mailing list where we send out invitations to our FREE full day trainings.  They were also part of our Annual Holiday Shopping Episode where we discuss all kinds of great assistive technology gift ideas. Click here to listen to that podcast and be sure to catch part 2 on Friday December 5, 2014.Finding the right gift for a loved one is a great feeling. We hope this guide or our holiday podcasts help you find that perfect gift for those on your list.Happy Holidays.Share this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedAM162 – Toys’R’Us Toy GuideDecember 18, 2015In “Accessibility Minute”Differently-Abled Toy Guide from Toys R UsDecember 23, 2009In “Products and Devices”ATU181 – Lekotek’s Toys and Games for kids with disabilities, Microsoft’s 3D soundscape, Virtual Conference for People with DyslexiaNovember 14, 2014In “Assistive Technology Update”last_img read more

Nearby Explorer App

first_imgYesterday I discussed a handful of apps that are fully accessible using VoiceOver.  One I didn’t discuss is Nearby Explorer, which is a GPS app for people who are blind.Nearby Explorer is yet another app from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH).  (If you’re unfamiliar with APH, it is a nonprofit that offers thousands of products and services for individuals of all ages with visual impairments.)This app was first available on the market back in 2013 for Android phones.  It is now available for iOS devices.  Instead of simply providing directions, it describes the environment in ways comparable to reading signs or observing road characteristics.It uses the phone’s GPS and compass to provide real-time information about the user’s surroundings.  It also displays maps on the screen that provide audio feedback with touch. Results are enhanced with “onboard data with Google Places business listings and Foursquare (iOS only).”Because the app uses a GPS receiver to read signals sent from an array of satellites, some of the following may impact accuracy:Low cloud coverLarge buildings or physical landmarks that prevent a clear view of the skyInside buildings or underground where there’s no clear view of skyUnusual atmospheric conditions, such as solar flares or magnetic stormsFeatures of Nearby Explorer:Provides surrounding and approaching streets, businesses, institutions, and public facilitiesContinually updates distance and directional information to nearest or selected destinationUsers are able to control the amount of detail they desireThe app provides a sense of the surrounding streets and their relationship to the user’s current locationIt allows users to monitor or aid a driver with navigational informationIt allows users to virtually explore the mapRequires the following:iPhone, iPad, or iPod running iOS 9.0 or laterGPS receiver either on the device or via BluetoothAt least 4.2 GB of free space on which to store complete North America downloaded maps May consume a lot of the battery; click here to learn more about battery consumptionClick here to learn more about the Nearby Explorer app!Share this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedLazarillo GPS on Google PlayDecember 19, 2017In “Apps”BlindSquare: Using Assistive Tech to Get AroundFebruary 27, 2014In “Tech Tips”The Future of BrailleMarch 22, 2017In “Apps”last_img read more

Ring update Timeline Alerts Previews

Smart Alerts are coming to all Ring users with the Ring Protect Plan in 2019, while Timeline and Camera Previews are coming sooner.Timeline will begin rolling out in November. Timeline allows the user to scroll through their event history, complete with a color-coded system with which to distinguish different sorts of events. Users can zoom in and out and view at will.Camera Previews are apparently out now – you’ll just have to head to the “New Feature” menu in the Ring app. Camera Previews allow the user to view all their devices in one view. These are preview images, so they’re not all updating with the same frame rate as the Live View, but should anything interesting seem to appear, one tap brings up Live View for any camera. Ring suggested today that they’re bringing 24/7 Recording “for an additional fee” for Ring Protect Plan subscribers. Also coming is a Bulk Download system for Ring Protect Plan subscribers, as well as timestamps for shared Ring recordings. Audible Announcements and Live Camera Previews will be released in the Ring app in 2019 – as well as the rest of the upcoming updates in this paragraph. The new Ring Smart Alerts system works with “cloud-based video analysis” to send alerts to Ring Protect Plan members. But not just any alerts – and certainly not every alert. This system sifts through all the potential alerts that COULD be sent to the end user and decides which are relevant and worth sending. With the new Smart Alerts system, Ring suggests that battery-powered Ring devices “will have a longer battery life by up to three times and more advanced motion detection features to reduce the number of false alerts.” These new Smart Alerts features are as follows.• Motion Verification• Motion Stop• Person Detection• Motion ZonesAdChoices广告Motion Verification works to rule out false alerts, while Motion Stop stops recording if the motion is “deemed unimportant.” Person Detection allows the system to identify the type of object that’s moving, and can ignore certain objects – like tree branches and squirrels. Motion Zones allow small sections of the full viewing area to be part of their motion detection alert system. The Ring smart doorbell and security system group revealed a number of updates to software this morning. They’re pushing new Smart Alerts, updates to their app experience, and a new Timeline. There’s a new way to work with Camera Previews straight from the Ring app, too. Story TimelineAmazon buys Ring as smart home security range growsThis great Ring Video Doorbell deal is thanks to Amazon’s acquisitionRing’s Neighbors app makes camera security sharing standaloneRing Alarm preorders open for DIY smart security with a twist read more

Audi Unveils Charging Station Fit For Electric Era

28 photos Audi e-tron GT To Debut AT LA Auto Show: 12 New EVs By 2025 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 18, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News First Look Inside & Out At The Audi e-tron By Autogefühl The charging station is kind of a fancy vision of how the electric era will look like. In reality, we will be happy if there is a network of chargers with high reliability. Looks don’t matter much.Audi e-tron will be one of the few models that can charge really quickly – at 150 kW it will need just a half hour to replenish 80% ofthe capacity of its 95 kWh battery. We need to add here that Audi deserves applause for the European on-board charging options – three-phase 11 kW (standard) and 22 kW (option), which is something the Jaguar I-PACE and Mercedes-Benz EQC lack.Here are details of the demonstration: Now, Bay Area residents can be among the first to check out the all-new e-tron at a four-day experience called ‘Charging Station Unleashed,’ located near the Embarcadero at 90 Broadway, San Francisco. ‘Charging Station Unleashed’Audi envisions a charging station for the electric era, celebrating the new all-electric Audi e-tron SUV in San FranciscoIn celebration of the global launch of the e-tron, Audi has reinvented the charging station for the electric era. Visitors to this interactive pop-up experience will have a glimpse into the future of electric mobility and be the first in America to see the 2019 e-tron in person and place their reservations. Other electric Audi vehicles on display include the championship winning Formula E racecar and the 764-horsepower, PB18 concept car, which debuted at Monterey Car Week in August (on display until Sept. 20).“The heart of the experience is a modern take on what a charging station could look like in the near future – a place where drivers of electric vehicles can refuel themselves while their vehicle recharges,” said Loren Angelo, vice president of Marketing, Audi of America.The experience will also offer complimentary charging from Audi for current electric car owners with chargers supplied by Electrify America.  Electrify America is investing $2 billion to create a nationwide network of highway, and community ultra-fast DC fast chargers, as well as Level 2 stations at workplace and multi-unit dwellings. These efforts are designed to take electric further than it’s ever gone before, and enable millions of American to discover the benefits of electric driving.Interactive exhibits:Interactive experiences will be on-site for consumers to see, touch and taste what the future of design and innovation can be in a future where ‘Electric has gone Audi,’ including:A kinetic energy capture installation that showcases how electric power could come from anywhere in the future, even human movement. The activation will showcase the power humans generate walking, hopping, or dancing across the energy capture floors. The positive energy will then animate a wall installation in real time.LED swings, nodding to the role the e-tron has in ushering in an era where technology, design and mobility are designed to combine to create a more thrilling experience.An innovative menu of reimagined “electric provisions” curated by James Beard award-winning Chef Stuart Brioza and Chef Nicole Krasinski from State Bird Provisions.The entire experience will run on social currency. Visitors won’t pay for anything in cash. Rather, they’ll receive special LED bracelets that let them access the station’s amenities when they share posts about the experience on social media.On-site reservations for the Audi e-tron SUV. This is the first time the e-tron will be available for consumers to see and experience the new vehicle, review product specifications, stats and options, and place a reservation right on-site with a fully refundable $1,000 reservation fee ahead of delivery in mid-2019. Source: Electric Vehicle News Newly Revealed Audi e-tron: Wallpaper Tuesday Audi envisions a charging station of the futureRight after the unveiling of the e-tron, Audi took a while to rest… accelerated the marketing campaign by presenting more stuff. The latest news from Audi is Charging Station Unleashed – a four-day experience near San Francisco’s Embarcadero (at 90 Broadway) that will display the all-new Audi e-tron, the championship Formula E racecar and the PB 18 all-electric concept car.The German brand will present the vehicles, its technology, accept reservations (the special Edition One is already sold out) and make people familiar with its charging station from Electrify America that will play a key role in Audi’s BEV rollout by placing hundreds of DC fast charging stations with multiple chargers at each location.Audi e-tron debut read more

2019 Chevrolet Volt Gets New Blackout Package

Source: Electric Vehicle News 2019 Chevy Volt, Bolt EV Pass Automobile Mag #noboringcars Test The 2019 Chevrolet Volt undergoes few changes, but a new blackout package is a thing.In fact, the Volt Blackout Package came along as a limited addition dealer-upgrade-only offering during the 2018 model year. But now, you can order a factory 2019 Chevrolet Volt with the package. For the 2018 model year, this option was only a limited edition and limited production upgrade, which was subject to dealers being able to outfit the car in such a way.Additional 2019 Chevrolet Volt News: 2019 Chevrolet Volt Slight Price Increase: Premier Gets 7.2 kW Charger According to GM Authority, the new Chevrolet Volt Blackout Package includes the following:Front and rear Black bowtie emblems17-inch split 5-spoke aluminum wheels with ultra-bright machined finish with painted gloss black pocketsSport pedal kitIt will cost you an extra $1,995 and can be had on either current Volt trim level: LT and Premier. Let’s hope the 2019 Chevrolet Volt continues the recent sales momentum that the outgoing model has enjoyed. Perhaps with the upgrades and added packages it will fare well.Source: GM Authority Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 17, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News 2019 Chevy Volt Finally Gets 7.2 kW Charger, -13 Degrees F Engine Activation read more

Arrival

first_imgby, David Goff, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShare2ShareEmail2 SharesThere is something happening, particularly with older people, which I don’t think has been commented upon.I think that this phenomenon needs to be reported and considered, for the sake of those getting older, and for the sake of everyone who is pursuing genuine happiness. There is an actualization of self that can take place, in the later years, that brings happiness, fulfillment, and most importantly, the kind of unique perspective that can make hope a real thing.I call this phenomenon “arrival”, and if you keep reading you’ll see why.What I have to report is paradoxical. It isn’t straightforward, or simple; that is probably why this change, this particular form of the initiatory attainment is not well-known. If you think about what I’m describing here, you will probably know someone who has achieved this state; it isn’t new, just not widely commented upon. In some strange way, there is a taboo here. Happiness, and even freedom, are achievable — just not the way that the mainstream is invested in. There is no wrinkle cream, other than life, that can convey this particular elixir. Some of us have come to life in a way that is both an arrival, and a real departure from the norms of our society.What am I referring to? Lately, I’ve observed, and gotten to know, people who are genuinely happy, full of life, who feel well situated and are already making a difference. These are people, which in my way of seeing things, have ripened. They have become themselves. These folks are, by and large, the elders amongst us. They don’t make a lot of noise, don’t call attention to themselves, don’t think they’ve done anything special, but they have achieved something, I think we all need to know about. They have arrived.By arrival I mean that they occupy the very rare space of becoming themselves while being on their journey. They have a sense of becoming whole, uniquely themselves, free to be what they need to be, and they have a destiny before them. They have arrived — and as part of their arrival — they know they are departing. They occupy a truly paradoxical, and special space.Arrival means they have become themselves, achieved true uniqueness, and are happily reconciled to this development being only half of the story. Death may come. They don’t fear it. Certainly adventure awaits them. Because they are themselves, they are ready. Their achievement, their existence, is important for us to notice. They reveal to us one prospective way to live, the possibility of actualizing ourselves, the miraculous perception that who we are, just might be what is needed.I’m not talking about your average old person here. Though I could be, it is never too late to become yourself. I’m addressing the fact that some people never stopped learning, and going through the hopper of hardship. These folks, it appears, found a way to use hardship, pain, and loss creatively. They have made of their lives works of art, they have found ways to become themselves, to achieve wholeness.They have a lot to teach us, but not in the school sort of way. Their knowledge isn’t something that can be transmitted in lectures, it takes the stuff of life. A part of the reason we need to know that such a thing as arrival is possible, is because to learn the art of being whole takes time, and is best communicated by absorption in the dilemmas of life. The elder best teaches by example. The learner learns best by honoring the teacher, and in this case, by noticing the arrival of those who know something important.I keep saying there is a paradox here. I don’t say that to show off, or to make this attainment seem more difficult than it is. I say it because I’m impressed by the unlikelihood of this development, by the life-giving, character building nature of what they have been through. Life, evidently cared about them enough, to have really roughed them up. They, in turn, seemed to have cared enough on their own, to have turned that hardship into something original.I remember once hearing a story, a part of which, went like this, “a Zen Master said to a group of his students, “You are perfect as you are, and you could use a little improvement.” I think that the paradox of our being explains what he means, and explains how elders could be arriving just as they are departing. I think we are always connected to the larger reality. For that reason, we are perfect as we are. We are after all a part of a larger whole that is also perfect as it is. Elders, as they become themselves, are little wholes who shine with the light of the larger whole, a joined part of that great magnificence.We human beings are part of that larger whole and we are a separate piece, responsible for our own wholeness. The journey includes becoming a part of the whole and becoming whole unto our selves. That is how the Zen students can be perfect as they are (they are manifestations of the whole, whole themselves) and need a little improvement (and they are evolving, semi-complete parts of the whole). Elders too are arriving, manifesting their wholeness, and departing, manifesting their evolving partness.Arrival is a real thing, a possibility that we cannot afford to ignore, just because it doesn’t look like completeness. Arrival is also essential to our kind. The old look like they are over the hill. The truth is that they have lived long enough to realize there is no hill, but there is the possibility of coming home, to them selves, and to the Universe. The rest of us, if we don’t notice elder actualization, live with no knowledge of the possibility of a homecoming. What is a journey that contains no arrival? Elders do arrive, and because they do, we know we can too.Related PostsA Confluence of Elder WisdomThe wisdom of elders is a hard-earned wisdom, a wisdom that could be meaningful now, that could be timely, that could help us find a way to ripen through this time of hardship.Happiness — A Report From the Slow LaneGrowing older has meant, for some of us, that we have arrived, despite still having further to go, at a time and place in our lives, where there are no roles, rules, or expectations, other than our own.Dilemma Story — Part 1I want to explore a kind of story that was designed by indigenous people to look collectively at difficult moral and social issues. The story–form is called the dilemma story.TweetShare2ShareEmail2 SharesTags: Elderhoodlast_img read more

New family support program improves patientcentered care and lowers hospitalization costs

first_imgMay 23 2018Families of critically ill hospital patients report higher satisfaction with clinician communication and a better perception of patient-centered care when the care team uses a low-cost strategy involving intensive emotional support and frequent meetings, according to the results of a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine randomized trial being presented today at the ATS 2018 International Conference in San Diego and scheduled for publication in the June 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.The program – known as PARTNER (PAiring Re-engineered ICU Teams with Nurse-driven Emotional Support and Relationship-building) – also reduced patients’ lengths of stay in intensive care units (ICUs) and lowered hospitalization costs. During the trial, the program cost an average of $170 per patient, but it reduced hospitalization costs by 28 percent.”One in five Americans die in or shortly after discharge from an ICU – typically when a loved one decides to forego life-prolonging therapies. That difficult decision can be made unnecessarily stressful when there are problems with communication between a patient’s family and their care team,” said Douglas B. White, M.D., M.A.S., director of the Clinical Research Investigation and Systems Modeling of Acute Illness (CRISMA) Center’s Program on Ethics and Decision Making in Pitt’s Department of Critical Care Medicine. “PARTNER helps the clinical team establish relationships and provide support to the family well before decisions have to be made about goals of care.”PARTNER is delivered by the interprofessional team in the ICU, consisting of nurses, physicians, spiritual care providers, social workers and others who play a part in patient care. The program is overseen by nurse-leaders in each ICU who receive 12 hours of advanced communication skills training to support families. The nurses meet with the families daily and arrange interdisciplinary clinician-family meetings within 48 hours of a patient coming to the ICU. A quality improvement specialist helps to incorporate the family support intervention into the clinicians’ workflow.Related StoriesHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell research’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesTo test its effectiveness, PARTNER was rolled out at five UPMC ICUs with different patient populations and staffing. It was implemented in a staggered fashion so that every participating ICU would eventually get PARTNER. Before receiving PARTNER, the ICUs continued their usual methods of supporting families of hospitalized patients. None of the ICUs had a set approach to family communication or required family meetings at regular intervals before receiving PARTNER.A total of 1,420 adult patients were enrolled in the trial, and 1,106 of these patients’ family members agreed to be a part of the study and its six-month follow-up surveys. The patients were very sick, with about 60 percent dying within six months of hospitalization and less than 1 percent living independently at home at that point.Families who participated in the intervention were more likely to report that their loved one received patient-centered care – where the patient’s comfort, emotional well-being, beliefs and cultural needs were respected and guided clinical actions. Of those receiving PARTNER, 79.2 percent scored their loved one’s care in the highest patient-centeredness category on an assessment, compared to 63.2 percent of those who received usual care.The intervention cut the average hospital length-of-stay by more than three days, from 13.5 to 10.4 days, and shortened the average time patients spent in the ICU from 7.4 to 6.7 days.”We also observed a slightly higher rate of in-hospital mortality, which came with families reporting more patient-centered care and better communication,” said White, who also holds the UPMC Chair for Ethics in Critical Care Medicine. “This was likely because the intervention supported families in determining what goals of care were most respectful to the patient as a person in the setting of very advanced illness.” ​​​​ Source:http://www.ccm.pitt.edu/news/team-approach-support-families-improves-icu-patient-centered-care-and-lowers-costslast_img read more

Analysis of Anglo Saxon teeth gives more reliable indicator of effects of

first_img Source:https://www.bradford.ac.uk/news/2018/anglo-saxon-teeththur-6-sept-2018.php Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 7 2018Evidence from the teeth of Anglo Saxon children could help identify modern children most at risk from conditions such as obesity, diabetes and heart disease.Researchers from the University of Bradford found that analysis of milk teeth of children’s skeletons from a 10th Century site in Northamptonshire, England, gave a more reliable indicator of the effects of diet and health than bone.The study, published today, 6 September 2018, in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, shows that by analyzing dentine from the milk teeth of the Anglo Saxon children, a picture emerges of the development of these children from the third trimester of pregnancy onwards, and is a proxy indicator of the health of the mothers. This is the first time that secure in utero data has been measured.Related StoriesHow black pharmacists are closing the cultural gap in health careWear protective clothing to reduce the risk of skin damage from sun’s UV raysIsraeli scientists invent new tooth fillings to fight recurrent decayThe skeletons analyzed at the University of Bradford come from a settlement at Raunds Furnells and are from a group known to have been under nourished. The effect of this under nourishment, or stress, is to limit the growth of bones. This can limit the evidence available from analysis of bones alone, such as age.Researchers were also able to look at children of different ages to see whether those who survived the first 1,000 days from conception, during which factors such as height are set, had different biomarkers for stress than those who died during this high-risk period.Teeth, unlike bone, continue to grow under such stress and, unlike bone, record high nitrogen values. This evidence gives a clearer picture of what is happening to the child from before birth. The teeth are, in effect, acting as an archive of diet and health of both the child and mother.Dr Julia Beaumont, of the University of Bradford’s School of Archeological and Forensic Sciences, said: “This is the first time that we have been able to measure with confidence the in utero nitrogen values of dentine. We find that when bone and teeth form at the same time, bone doesn’t record high nitrogen values that occur during stress. Our hypothesis is that bone isn’t growing but teeth are. So archeology can’t rely on the evidence from bones alone because bone is not forming and recording during high stress and we can’t be sure, for example, of the age of a skeleton. Teeth are more reliable as they continue to grow even when a child is starving.”As well as the archeological significance of this method of analysis, Dr Beaumont believes it has a direct application to modern medicine.She said: “There is a growing consensus that factors such as low birthweight have a significant impact on our likelihood of developing conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and obesity and that the first 1,000 days from conception onwards set our ‘template’. By analyzing the milk teeth of modern children in the same way as the Anglo Saxon skeletons, we can measure the same values and see the risk factors they are likely to face in later life, enabling measures to be taken to mitigate such risks.”last_img read more

MIT grad brings new refrigeration system to rural India

Every year in India, millions of gallons of milk gathered by rural farmers from their small herds spoil on their way to market. Last week, the co-founder of a U.S. startup company that is trying to solve that supply chain problem was named one of seven “invention ambassadors” in a new program that highlights the value of technology-driven solutions to global problems.When Sorin Grama graduated with a master’s degree in engineering and management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2007 and started Promethean Power Systems with entrepreneur Sam White, their goal was to sell solar power concentrators to generate electricity in clinics and schools in villages without a dependable source of electricity. But the villages couldn’t find a use for the expensive technology, so Grama and White turned their attention to the country’s dairy industry, which is dominated by farmers with a few cows and who depend on rickshas, bikes, or their own feet to transport the warm milk on the first leg of its long journey from farm to local village collection center to the dairy plant. “[Milk] really is like liquid cash to them, because milk is something you harvest and sell daily,” says Grama, an electrical engineer who invented a refrigeration system to help these villagers keep their milk fresh longer. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe On 1 July, the Lemelson Foundation announced that Grama and six other inventor-entrepreneurs had been named invention ambassadors. The event, co-sponsored by AAAS (which publishes ScienceInsider), marks the start of a 3-year effort to engage inventors with the public through talks with everyone from high school students to policymakers.Grama’s invention is called the rapid milk chiller, a dome-shaped machine that couples to a thermal energy battery to cool milk from 35°C to 4°C. The rapid milk chiller cools the milk by means of a heat exchange with cold fluid inside the dome. When electrical power is not available, the rapid milk chiller can cool up to 500 liters of milk using only the thermal energy stored in the battery.Dairy plants install the chiller-battery pairs in village collection centers. Now, villagers can keep their milk fresh for up to 2 days. Dairy trucks don’t have to make daily rounds and no longer have to transport milk from a village collection center to a separate chilling center. The dairy plants can also extend their reach to more isolated villages with rapid milk chillers.Promethean Power has sold 60 chiller-battery pairs to dairy processing facilities since the first one was installed 3 years ago. The company plans to produce more chiller-battery pairs as demand rises, and Grama and White hope to apply their technology to cool vegetables and other perishable food items. read more

A step closer to explaining hightemperature superconductivity

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Just how the copper-and-oxygen, or cuprate, superconductors work remains unclear. The materials contain planes of copper and oxygen ions with the coppers arranged in a square pattern. Repelling one another, the electrons get stuck in a one-to-a-copper traffic jam called a Mott insulator state. They also spin like tops, and at low temperatures neighboring electrons spin in opposite directions, creating an up-down-up-down pattern of magnetism called antiferromagnetism. Superconductivity sets in when impurities soak up a few electrons and ease the traffic jam. The remaining electrons then pair to glide freely along the planes.Theorists do not yet agree how that pairing occurs. Some think that wavelike ripples in the antiferromagnetic pattern act as a glue to attract one electron to the other. Others argue that the pairing arises, paradoxically, from the repulsion among the electrons alone. Theorists can write down a mathematical model of electrons on a checkerboard plane, known as the Fermi-Hubbard model, but it is so hard to “solve” that nobody has been able to show whether it produces superconductivity.Experimentalists hope to reproduce the Fermi-Hubbard model in laser light and cold atoms to see if it yields superconductivity. In 2002, Immanuel Bloch, a physicist at the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ) in Garching, Germany, and colleagues realized a Mott insulator state in an optical lattice. Six years later, Esslinger and colleagues achieved the Mott state with atoms with the right amount of spin to mimic electrons. Now, Randall Hulet, a physicist at Rice University in Houston, Texas, and colleagues have nearly achieved the next-to-last step along the way: antiferromagnetism.Hulet and colleagues trapped between 100,000 and 250,000 lithium-6 atoms in laser light. They then ramped up the optical lattice and ramped it back down to put them in order. Shining laser light of a specific wavelength on the atoms, they observed evidence of an emerging up-down-up-down spin pattern. The laser light was redirected, or diffracted, at a particular angle by the rows of atoms—just as x-rays diffract off the ions in a real crystal. Crucially, the light probed the spin of the atoms: The light wave flipped if it bounced off an atom spinning one way but not the other. Without that flipping, the diffraction wouldn’t have occurred, so observation confirms the emergence of the up-down-up-down pattern, Hulet says.Hulet’s team solved a problem that has plagued other efforts. Usually, turning the optical lattice on heats the atoms. To avoid that, the researchers added another laser that slightly repelled the atoms, so that the most energetic ones were just barely held by the trap. Then, as the atoms heated, the most energetic ones “evaporated” like steam from hot soup to keep the other ones cool, the researchers report online this week in Nature. They didn’t quite reach a full stable antiferromagnetic pattern: The temperature was 40% too high. But the technique might get there and further, Hulet says. “We don’t have a good sense of what the limit of this method is,” he says. “We could get a factor of two lower, we could get a factor of 10 lower.””It is indeed very promising,” says Tin-Lun “Jason” Ho, a theorist at Ohio State University, Columbus. Reducing the temperature by a factor of two or three might be enough to reach the superconducting state, he says. However, MPQ’s Bloch cautions that it may take still other techniques to get that cold. “There are several cooling techniques that people are developing and interesting experiments coming up,” he says.Physicists are also exploring other systems and problems with optical lattices. The approach is still gaining steam, Hulet says: “It’s an exciting time.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emailcenter_img For years some physicists have been hoping to crack the mystery of high-temperature superconductivity—the ability of some complex materials to carry electricity without resistance at temperatures high above absolute zero—by simulating crystals with patterns of laser light and individual atoms. Now, a team has taken—almost—the next-to-last step in such “optical lattice” simulation by reproducing the pattern of magnetism seen in high-temperature superconductors from which the resistance-free flow of electricity emerges.”It’s a very big improvement over previous results,” says Tilman Esslinger, an experimentalist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, who was not involved in the work. “It’s very exciting to see steady progress.”An optical lattice simulation is essentially a crystal made of light. A real crystal contains a repeating 3D pattern of ions, and electrons flow from ion to ion. In the simulation, spots of laser light replace the ions, and ultracold atoms moving among spots replace the electrons. Physicists can adjust the pattern of spots, how strongly the spots attract the atoms, and how strongly the atoms repel one another. That makes the experiments ideal for probing physics such as high-temperature superconductivity, in which materials such as mercury barium calcium copper oxide carry electricity without resistance at temperatures up to 138 K, far higher above absolute zero than ordinary superconductors such as niobium can. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Your future smartwatch might be printed with an inkjet printer

first_img Email Imagine getting the latest smartwatch or a high-tech heart attack warning detector from your inkjet printer. Researchers have taken a step in this direction by printing cheap, reliable arrays of transistors—the key components of modern electronics—and using them to carry out elementary computing tasks. The work might someday help usher in a new era of organic, flexible consumer electronics.Instead of the usual silicon, the new circuits were fashioned out of organic—or carbon-based—compounds. And whereas others have printed and stacked organic electronic components using a mix of inkjet printing and other deposition methods, the new work uses just an inkjet printer for the entire process. “I cannot think of another [device with at least two layers] where everything was done with inkjet printing,” says Ananth Dodabalapur, an electrical engineer at the University of Texas in Austin who was not involved in the work. “This is a good demonstration.”New commercial electronic devices must be compact, durable, and amenable to mass production. Nearly all mass market devices rely on microchips of the chemical element silicon, on which manufacturers etch ever smaller transistors—essentially electrical switches that can be used to fashion logic circuits for computers. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) But silicon chips have some disadvantages. Silicon wafers are stiff, so it’s difficult to make silicon-based circuitry flexible. Many think that flexible, wearable electronics built from organic materials could open up new applications for electronics. For example, flexible electronics could gather vital medical data such as the stiffness of arteries, which can help predict heart attacks, and brain electrical activity, which can signal oncoming epileptic seizures.To help realize that potential, Sungjune Jung, an electrical engineer at Pohang University of Science and Technology in South Korea, and colleagues set out to see whether they could simply print working networks of organic transistors. To cram in as many transistors as possible, they designed transistors that could be stacked on top of each other, rather than placed side by side on a chip, effectively packing two transistors into the space usually occupied by one.They printed the 3-micrometer-tall circuits one layer at a time with an inkjet printer: On the bottom, they laid down the carbon-based compound that would form the parts from which electrical current would flow into and out of one transistor, then the metal electrodes that would control the current in both transistors, and, finally, the compound that would form the current-carrying parts of the other transistor. Between the layers of transistors they deposited thin films of a protective material called parylene. The device included more than 100 transistors, enough to form logical circuits that completed several basic computations, including adding two numbers.Jung’s device hit a number of key benchmarks. All the transistors worked, even 8 months after production—an impressive feat for organic electronics, which often degrade quickly. Moreover, the process required temperatures no higher than 120°C, compared with many hundreds of degrees on a typical silicon wafer fabrication line, the team reports in ACS Nano.Still, the printed devices are far from competing with silicon. The team was able to pack about five transistors into a square millimeter, whereas integrated circuit chips in today’s computers cram millions into the same space. “Our technology, in terms of transistor density, is at the stage of silicon technology in the late 1960s or early 1970s, when the first microprocessors came out,” Jung says.Because the researchers were aiming to demonstrate a concept rather than prototype a product, Jung’s team printed its circuit on stiff glass. But he says they have already printed similar components on flexible plastic, and plan to publish that result soon. Dodabalapur also notes that by some metrics, the new device lags behind what others have already achieved with organic circuits. For example, the type of computing logic the team used requires more transistors than other approaches, largely wiping out gains from more closely packing the components. And the transistors operated relatively slowly and inconsistently, he says. Moreover, although it’s possible to use inkjet printing for every step in the manufacturing process, he says, “I don’t see any advantage … to restrict oneself to one printing or patterning technique.”But such imperfections might be ironed out as a product moves to commercialization, says Janos Veres, a flexible electronics expert at PARC, a research institution in Palo Alto, California. He applauds the study for showing a novel way to print and protect organic circuit components, and imagines future labels or sensors containing stacks of not just two, but many transistors, perhaps working in concert with silicon chips or other technologies. “Ultimately we do see the opportunity to print microchips,” he says.last_img read more

Updated USDA responds to outcry over removal of animal welfare documents lawsuit

first_imgThe U.S. Department of Agriculture inspects research facilities that use animals, such as this rabbit. Updated: USDA responds to outcry over removal of animal welfare documents, lawsuit threats In this letter to the U.S. Department of Justice, the animal welfare organization reminded the government that under the terms of a 2009 legal settlement with HSUS, USDA had agreed to make public some of the records it has now scrubbed from its public database. HSUS, its lawyers write, “is exercising its rights under [the 2009 settlement] and intends to take further action unless USDA agrees to reconsider this bizarre reversal of the agency’s longstanding policy” of making inspection records and others publicly available.The animal organization’s letter notes that under the terms of the 2009 settlement, the two parties, HSUS and USDA, now have 30 days to settle their differences. After that, HSUS can ask the court to reopen the lawsuit.A spokesperson for USDA did not in the course of 3 hours return an email and a call requesting comment.The HSUS letter also argues that USDA’s actions violate laws governing the electronic release of data under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). One of the laws requires agencies to “make available for public inspection … [By] electronic means” all FOIA requests that it releases to anyone and that it determines are likely to be asked for again, by others. When they were public, many of USDA’s inspection reports, especially those of troubled facilities, were accessed repeatedly by a number of different users.The lawsuit that was settled in 2009 was brought by HSUS in 2005, after USDA refused to release under FOIA annual reports about animals in biomedical research labs. The 2009 settlement stipulated that the agency must promptly and publicly post those reports from 2009 to 2013. It does not address the years after 2013, nor does it address the many other kinds of documents that were scrubbed from USDA’s public database on Friday. For instance, inspection reports of animal facilities were not covered in the settlement.Kathleen Conlee, the vice president for animal research at HSUS in Washington, D.C., concedes that the settlement was limited to records through 2013, but adds: “The arguments still apply: Taxpayers have a right to know what animals are being used, how many, and whether they experience pain and distress.” She also noted that personal identifying information is already redacted from what until Friday were the publicly posted reports.The scrubbed documents detail inspections, animal censuses, enforcement actions, and annual reports on about 7800 facilities, including some 1100 research labs, where animals that are protected under the Animal Welfare Act are kept. Other facilities covered in the reports include zoos, circuses, and animal transporters.The removal of the documents on Friday prompted an outcry from animal welfare advocates. “With this announcement, transparency has not just been limited—it is has been eliminated,” said Eric Kleiman, a research consultant to the Animal Welfare Institute in Washington, D.C.USDA said that the blacking out of the documents was a result of its “commitment to being transparent, remaining responsive to our stakeholders’ informational needs, and maintaining the privacy rights of individuals.” It also stated that the decision to remove the records from public view resulted from a yearlong “comprehensive review,” and noted that individuals will continue to be able to access records through FOIA requests. Those can take months or years to receive responses.“I would certainly agree that protection of personal information is of utmost importance, especially given the rich history of targeting the individuals involved in animal research,” said Matthew Bailey, the president of the Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR) in Washington, D.C., which defends the use of animals in research, in a statement. “However, this change also makes it more time consuming, although not impossible, for organizations like FBR to analyze trends in animal use in research.”Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of HSUS, stated in this blog today that Brian Klippenstein, executive director of a group called Protect the Harvest, is leading the transition team at USDA. The group on its website lists among its objectives informing “America’s consumers, businesses and decision-makers about the threats posed by animal rights groups and anti-farming extremists.”Protect the Harvest did not immediately return an emailed request for comment.*Update, 6 February, 8:06 p.m.: This story has been updated to clarify the details of the 2009 settlement. By Meredith WadmanFeb. 7, 2017 , 12:15 PM Email *Update, 7 February, 12:15 p.m.: The U.S. Department of Agriculture released a statement this morning regarding the removal of animal welfare reports from its Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) website: “The review of APHIS’ website has been ongoing, and the agency is striving to balance the need for transparency with rules protecting individual privacy. In 2016, well before the change of Administration, APHIS decided to make adjustments to the posting of regulatory records. In addition, APHIS is currently involved in litigation concerning, among other issues, information posted on the agency’s website. While the agency is vigorously defending against this litigation, in an abundance of caution, the agency is taking additional measures to protect individual privacy. These decisions are not final. Adjustments may be made regarding information appropriate for release and posting.”This morning, Speaking of Research, an international organization that supports the use of animals in scientific labs, also weighed in on the issue. In a blog post, the organization says it has “considerable concerns about the wealth of information that has been removed from the USDA website in the last week.” The post continues, “When information is hidden … the public wonders what is being hidden and why, and researchers must devote even more resources to combatting the public perception that they are not transparent.” The group has uploaded some of USDA’s past reports on its website.  NiDerLander/iStockphoto Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) today put USDA on notice that it intends to use legal tools to force the agency to restore tens of thousands of documents on animal welfare that it removed from its website on Friday. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Monkeys master a key sign of selfawareness recognizing their reflections

first_imgRhesus monkeys can learn to recognize themselves in a mirror. dbimages/Alamy Stock Photo By Virginia MorellFeb. 13, 2017 , 4:30 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Monkeys master a key sign of self-awareness: recognizing their reflections Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe But some researchers wonder whether failure is simply a sign that the exam itself is inadequate, perhaps because some animals can’t understand how mirrors work. Some animals—like rhesus monkeys, dogs, and pigs—don’t recognize themselves in mirrors, but can use them to find food. That discrepancy puzzled Mu-ming Poo, a neurobiologist at the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences in China, and one of the study’s authors. “There must be some transition between that simple mirror use and recognizing yourself,” he says.So Poo and his colleagues put three young male rhesus monkeys through an intensive training program. Each monkey was secured in a chair facing a mirror, and researchers flashed a red laser pointer at random positions nearby. When the monkeys touched the dot, they received a treat. Sometimes, they could see the dot only by using the mirror. “The monkey has to learn that the hand in the mirror is his own hand. And he has to learn how to control it precisely by watching it in the mirror,” Poo says. “That’s the key.” Three other monkeys, who served as controls, weren’t trained to respond.  After several weeks of training, the scientists gave each monkey a classic MSR test, applying an odorless red, black, or green splotch to the animal’s cheek or eyebrow and putting it in a cage with a full-length mirror. The trained monkeys didn’t hesitate; they looked in their mirrors, pawed at the marks, and smelled their fingers, the scientists report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. When left alone and unmarked, they did just what you’d expect from someone who’s just discovered how mirrors work: They bent over and inspected their genitals, opened their mouths to examine their teeth, and carefully combed their hair. “That showed that they recognize themselves and know they are looking at their own bodies,” Poo says. The control monkeys did none of these things. Strange as it might seem, not all animals can immediately recognize themselves in a mirror. Great apes, dolphins, Asian elephants, and Eurasian magpies can do this—as can human kids around age 2. Now, some scientists are welcoming another creature to this exclusive club: carefully trained rhesus monkeys. The findings suggest that with time and teaching, other animals can learn how mirrors work, and thus learn to recognize themselves—a key test of cognition.“It’s a really interesting paper because it shows not only what the monkeys can’t do, but what it takes for them to succeed,” says Diana Reiss, a cognitive psychologist at Hunter College in New York City, who has given the test to dolphins and Asian elephants in other experiments.The mirror self-recognition test (MSR) is revered as a means of testing self-awareness. A scientist places a colored, odorless mark on an animal where it can’t see it, usually the head or shoulder. If the animal looks in the mirror and spontaneously rubs the mark, it passes the exam. Successful species are said to understand the concept of “self” versus “other.” “The training seems to switch on a light bulb in the monkeys,” says Reiss, adding that even animals in the self-awareness club have to learn about mirrors. “[The spontaneous users] learned on their own what the monkeys learned from their training.”The study suggests that the mental processes underlying the mirror test are shared across primates, but that monkeys need more information to pass it, says primatologist Frans de Waal of Emory University in Atlanta, who was not involved with the study. Still, he and others point out that untrained monkeys continue to fail the test.“These are not spontaneous, self-directed behaviors, which is the point of the MSR test,” says Lori Marino, a biopsychologist and executive director of The Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy in Kanab, Utah, who was not involved in the study. She thinks the study has “in no way challenged [the test’s] validity.”Next, Poo and his colleagues plan to scan the brains of monkeys during their mirror training to see which brain circuits might be changing in the process. Meanwhile, Poo urges other scientists to come up with new tests for self-recognition in other species–a skill he suspects may be more common than we think.last_img read more

Podcast Raccoon latrines and microbial medicine

first_imgcuatrok77/Flickr David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about a long-term project monitoring raccoon latrines in California. What influence do these wild bathrooms have on the ecosystem?Sarah also interviews Christian Jobin of the University of Florida in Gainesville about his Perspective on three papers linking the success of cancer immunotherapy with microbes in the gut—it turns out which bacteria live in a cancer patient’s intestines can predict their response to this cutting-edge cancer treatment.Read the related papers:Routy et al., Gut microbiome influences efficacy of PD-1–based immunotherapy against epithelial tumors, Science 2018Gopalakrishnan et al., Gut microbiome modulates response to anti–PD-1 immunotherapy in melanoma patients, Science 2018Matson et al., The commensal microbiome is associated with anti–PD-1 efficacy in metastatic melanoma patients, Science 2018 aan4236Listen to previous podcasts.[Image: cuatrok77/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more

China unveils design for 5 billion particle smasher

first_img By Dennis NormileNov. 16, 2018 , 3:30 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country China unveils design for $5 billion particle smasher Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) China’s Circular Electron Positron Collider would be built underground in a 100-kilometer-circumference tunnel at an as-yet-undetermined site. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img BEIJING—The center of gravity in high energy physics could move to Asia if either of two grand plans is realized. At a workshop here last week, Chinese scientists unveiled the full conceptual design for the proposed Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC), a $5 billion machine to tackle the next big challenge in particle physics: studying the Higgs boson. (Part of the design was published in the summer.) Now, they’re ready to develop detailed plans, start construction in 2022, and launch operations around 2030—if the Chinese government agrees to fund it.Meanwhile, Japan’s government is due to decide by the end of December whether to host an equally costly machine to study the Higgs, the International Linear Collider (ILC). How Japan’s decision might affect China’s, which is a few years away, is unclear. But it seems increasingly likely that most of the future action around the Higgs will be in Asia. Proposed “Higgs factories” in Europe are decades away and the United States has no serious plans.The Higgs boson, key to explaining how other particles gain mass, was discovered at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, in 2012—more than 40 years after being theoretically predicted. Now, scientists want to confirm the particle’s properties, how it interacts with other particles, and whether it contributes to dark matter. Having only mass but no spin and no charge, the Higgs is really a “new kind of elementary particle” that is both “a special part of the standard model” and a “harbinger of some profound new principles,” says Nima Arkani-Hamed, a theorist at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Answering the most important questions in particle physics today “involves studying the Higgs to death,” he says. Email IHEP “Physicists want at least one machine,” says Joao Guimaraes da Costa, a physicist at the Chinese Academy of Sciences’s Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) here, which put together the Chinese proposal. “Ideally, both should be built,” because each has its scientific merits, adds Hitoshi Murayama, a theoretical physicist at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Tokyo’s Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe in Kashiwa, Japan.The CERN discovery relied on the Large Hadron Collider, a 27-kilometer ring in which high-energy protons traveling in opposite directions are steered into head-on collisions. This produces showers of many types of particles, forcing physicists to sift through billions of events to spot the telltale signal of a Higgs. It’s a bit like smashing together cherry pies, Murayama says: “A lot of goo flies out when what you are really looking for is the little clinks between pits.”Smashing electrons into their antimatter counterparts, positrons, results in cleaner collisions that typically produce one Z particle and one Higgs boson at a time, says Bill Murray of The University of Warwick in Coventry, U.K. How Z particles decay is well understood, so other signals can be attributed to the Higgs “and we can watch what it does,” Murray says.Japan’s plan to build an electron-positron collider grew from international investigations in the 1990s. Physicists favored a linear arrangement, in which the particles are sent down two straight opposing raceways, colliding like bullets in rifles put muzzle to muzzle. That design promises higher energies, because it avoids the losses that result when charged particles are sent in a circle, causing them to shed energy in the form of x-rays. Its disadvantage is that particles that don’t collide are lost; in a circular design they continue around the ring for another chance at colliding.Along the way, Japan signaled it might host the machine and shoulder the lion’s share of the cost, with other countries contributing detectors, other components, and expertise. A 2013 basic design envisioned a 500-giga-electronvolt (GeV) linear collider in a 31-kilometer tunnel costing almost $8 billion, not counting labor. But by then, the CERN team had already pegged the Higgs mass at 125 GeV, making the ILC design “overkill,” Murayama says. The group has since revised the plan, aiming for a 250-GeV accelerator housed in a 20-kilometer-long tunnel and costing $5 billion, says Murayama, who is also deputy director of the Linear Collider Collaboration, which coordinates global R&D work on several future colliders.IHEP scientists made their own proposal just 2 months after the Higgs was announced. They recognized the energy required for a Higgs factory “is still in a range where circular is better,” Murray says. With its beamlines buried in a 100-kilometer-circumference tunnel at a site yet to be chosen, the CEPC would collide electrons and positrons at up to 240 GeV.Both approaches have their advantages. The CEPC will produce Higgs at roughly five times the rate of ILC, allowing research to move faster. But Murayama notes that the ILC could easily be upgraded to higher energies by extending the tunnel by another couple of kilometers. Most physicists don’t want to choose. The two colliders “are quite complementary,” Murray says.Whether politicians and funding agencies agree remains to be seen. Construction of the CEPC hinges on funding under China’s next 5-year plan, which starts in 2021, says IHEP Director Wang Yifang. IHEP would then also seek international contributors. Murayama says Japan needs to say yes to the ILC in time to negotiate support from the European Union under a particle physics strategy to be hammered out in 2019. Missing that opportunity could mean delaying the collider by 20 years, he says—and perhaps ceding the field to China.last_img read more

This diseased spine may hold clues to early doghuman relationship

first_img Email Katherine Latham Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By David GrimmJun. 14, 2019 , 8:00 AM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Katherine Latham with her dogs Spark (left) and Lucy (right) Katherine Latham This diseased spine may hold clues to early dog-human relationship Scientists are still debating when and where dogs were domesticated, but there’s one thing most of them agree on: Early canines were working animals. Dogs evolved from gray wolves earlier than 15,000 years ago—before humans settled down in permanent villages—and they likely helped us hunt small game like deer and rabbits and pulled sleds or other transport equipment across vast plains. To buttress the idea that early dogs helped us carry supplies, archaeologists have often pointed to an aberration in the spines of many ancient canines: an overgrowth of bone known as spondylosis deformans, which researchers thought was caused by hauling heavy loads.But a new paper debunks that idea. Reporting in PLOS ONE, Katherine Latham, a graduate student at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, finds that heavy lifting cannot be definitively linked to spondylosis deformans in dogs. The condition, however, may tell us something equally fascinating about our ancestors’ bond with canines. Latham discussed her new work with Science.This interview has been edited for clarity and length. Q: What does this spine condition look like?A: If you look at the spine of a dog with spondylosis deformans, you can see these bony growths on the vertebrae, from small spurs to large scoop-shaped growths. In some cases, they grow over the joints that separate vertebrae. Spondylosis deformans is very common in mammals; if you’re over 30, you probably have it. But most people—and dogs—don’t have symptoms unless the growths are very large, in which case they can sometimes lead to back stiffness.Q: Why would load pulling lead to this condition in ancient dogs?A: The idea is that the stress of pulling or carrying loads might contribute to the disease in dogs, as it seems to in other draft animals like cattle. Since at least the 1970s, many archaeologists have assumed the condition is a telltale sign that early dogs pulled heavy loads. But there was no empirical evidence. It’s an idea that has become perpetuated in literature without anyone going back and testing it. The spine of a dog with spondylosis deformans, seen most prominently in the scoop-shaped structure jutting out from the middle vertebra. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Q: How did you test it?A: I spent about 4 or 5 months traveling to museums and universities in the U.S. and Europe that housed wolf and dog remains. I looked at the bones of 136 dogs, the vast majority of which were pets and had not been used as working dogs. I also looked at 19 sled dogs and 241 modern wolves; most were wild, but a few had lived in zoos.Spondylosis deformans was very common in dogs, regardless of whether or not they pulled sleds. It was also common in wolves. The biggest correlation had to do with age: By 3 to 5 years of age, half of the dogs had some sort of spondylosis deformans, and the older they got, the more of them had it. By 9 years old, almost everyone had it. There’s no evidence that spondylosis deformans should be used as an indicator of dogs pulling loads. It’s just a product of the normal wear and tear of aging, as it is in people.Q: So what can the presence of the condition in ancient dogs tell us?A: Ancient dogs with a lot of spondylosis deformans are probably older dogs. And in order for them to have reached that age, someone must have been taking care of them. Humans were likely giving them food and sharing the warmth of their fires and the protection of their shelters. Also, if these dogs got injured when helping humans hunt, people probably tended to their wounds. Wild wolves usually don’t live past age 5, often because they’re injured while hunting. And indeed we found that wolves living in captivity were far more likely to suffer from spondylosis deformans than wild wolves, probably because they were living a lot longer. All of this suggests that humans viewed early dogs differently than other animals. It could be that they valued them as important hunting assistants, or it could have gone deeper to something like companionship.I have two dogs—we spend thousands of dollars on their food and care. We spoil them rotten. I don’t think it was too much different in the past.last_img read more

Facebook fact checker has ties to news outlet that promotes climate doubt

first_img Originally published by E&E NewsFacebook’s newest fact checking partner is connected to an enterprise that was founded by a conservative Fox News host and that routinely promotes climate doubt.The social media giant is partnering with CheckYourFact.com to provide third-party oversight of news on its platform, Facebook announced last week. Check Your Fact is an affiliate of The Daily Caller, the right-leaning news outlet co-founded by Fox News host Tucker Carlson. CJG-Technology/Alamy Stock Photo Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Climate scientists and advocates are worried that the new partnership means climate articles will be downplayed on Facebook.The climate stories published by The Daily Caller create a false impression of the level of certainty about human-caused global warming within the climate science field, said Susan Joy Hassol, director of the science outreach nonprofit group Climate Communication, which operates as a project of the Aspen Global Change Institute in Basalt, Colorado. In particular, The Daily Caller has mastered a form of partial truth telling that isn’t technically wrong but doesn’t give the full picture, either, she said.“You can really mislead people without outright lying, and in a way that’s more dangerous,” she said. “You can’t prove it false; you can’t say what they’ve said is inaccurate, that it’s a lie; you can’t say any of that. Then somebody would have to say it’s true — well, it’s not true because it’s not the whole truth.”Carlson co-founded The Daily Caller with Neil Patel, former chief policy adviser to Vice President Dick Cheney. Many of its stories are produced by the staff of the Daily Caller News Foundation, which receives funding from the Charles Koch Foundation, as well as a number of other conservative foundations that fund groups that attack climate science.Check Your Fact is wholly owned by The Daily Caller, and its work is routinely promoted by the news organization. While it is editorially independent and has its own staff, Check Your Fact receives funding from both The Daily Caller, as well as the Daily Caller News Foundation, according to the company.Joel Kaplan, a vice president at Facebook and a former White House aide to President George W. Bush, pushed for the company to partner with The Daily Caller for about a year, The Wall Street Journal reported last year. Kaplan, who is an ally of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, has sought changes at Facebook amid complaints by some conservatives that the company is biased against them.Check Your Fact is one of just six organizations that Facebook currently lists as fact checkers in the United States. The others include Pulitzer Prize winners such as the Associated Press and PolitiFact. All of the fact checkers have passed an assessment test implemented by the Poynter Institute’s International Fact-Checking Network.Facebook set up its fact checking operation as a response to extensive criticism that the platform is often used to spread misinformation. Russia exploited Facebook in the 2016 election to spread divisions and false information to the public. The platform is still home to a number of climate denial groups that use it to spread falsehoods about climate science.The social media company gives its fact checkers tremendous power to reduce the number of viewers who can see news in their feeds.“If a fact-checker rates content as false, it will appear lower in News Feed,” the Facebook fact checking page states. “This significantly reduces the number of people who see it.”Facebook did not respond to requests for comment on how exactly the new partnership with Check Your Fact will work.“We’re fair”David Sivak, editor at Check Your Fact, said the organization does not have an editorial position on global warming.“We don’t have an editorial stance on climate change, or any other topic for that matter,” he wrote in response to questions. “We’re fact checkers, and we take our credibility seriously. Look through any of the articles Check Your Fact has published over the last two years, and you’ll quickly see that. We’re fair and always give the reader a complete picture.”Check Your Fact recently fact checked President Trump’s incorrect statement that wind turbines cause cancer.While the website labeled the claim as false—and quoted cancer experts saying as much—it also quoted National Wind Watch, an antiwind group that organizes and fights against wind turbines throughout the country. A spokesman for that group claimed the president was correct; he said turbines cause a lack of sleep and stress, which can lead to cancer.In March, Check Your Fact gave credence to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s claims that the Green New Deal would cost more than every dollar the federal government has spent in its history. The Kentucky Republican and Check Your Fact relied on a single study, produced by a conservative think tank, the American Action Forum.But the author of that study has acknowledged that its calculation of a $93 trillion price tag is essentially a guess, since the Green New Deal is currently a vague resolution. E&E News has reported on how the American Action Forum is connected to a web of conservative groups that fund political attacks through undisclosed donors and that have been funded by fossil fuel lobbying interests opposed to environmental regulations (Climatewire, April 1).Highlighting skepticsThe Daily Caller, for its part, has a long history of giving its readers the impression that climate science is largely a political fight, rather than a rigorous scientific inquiry. It regularly attacks mainstream news outlets for their reporting on climate science, instead amplifying conservative think tanks and skeptical Republicans and the small number of climate scientists with legitimate academic credentials. Its climate reporting focuses on doubt and highlights data that suggests climate concerns from the world’s leading science agencies and organizations are incorrect.Just this week, the news organization published a piece that called into doubt the accuracy of climate models. The piece claimed that “many climate scientists are skeptical of the extreme warming predicted by next-generation climate models.” The article cited a few skeptical researchers but did not sample the far greater range of researchers who have shown that climate predictions from years past have held up to actual observations. Scientists are largely confident in climate models, even as they seek to improve their forecasting of future conditions.In fact, the American Meteorology Society released a statement on climate change that included praise for the accuracy of climate models.“Climate models successfully replicate the global warming of the twentieth century, and they agree that further warming and other global and regional changes can be expected this century,” the statement read.Last fall, when the Trump administration released the National Climate Assessment, The Daily Caller trumpeted a series of headlines that framed the report as a controversial, political document—rather than one crafted over years through the Obama and Trump administrations and that was reliant on dozens of peer-reviewed studies. The National Climate Assessment was produced by 300 scientists across 13 federal agencies and was reviewed by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.The Daily Caller’s reporting on the national assessment focused on climate skeptics who have been critical of the larger field of climate science for years.In one of its first stories on the report, the news organization relied on University of Colorado scientist Roger Pielke Jr., who believes humans are contributing to climate change but questions links between warming and extreme weather events.“‘EMBARRASSING’: CLIMATE EXPERT EXPLAINS WHAT’S WRONG WITH THE WHITE HOUSE’S NEW CLIMATE REPORT,” The Daily Caller stated.After the report was released, President Trump told reporters from Axios, while making an ocean wave motion with his hand, that climate goes up and down.“Is there climate change? Yeah. Will it go back like this, I mean, will it change back? Probably,” Trump said.News outlets around the world corrected Trump’s misstatement. The Daily Caller found a different angle: “REPORTERS PRESS TRUMP ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING, HE ANSWERS WITH FACTS.”“Kernel of doubt”One frequent target of The Daily Caller’s reporting is climate scientist Michael Mann of Pennsylvania State University in State College. He said he was disturbed to hear that Facebook is giving the outlet a much broader platform on which to attack climate science.“It is truly disturbing to hear that Facebook, already known to be a dubious organization with an ethically challenged CEO, is partnering with Daily Caller, which is essentially a climate change-denying Koch Brothers front group masquerading as a media outlet,” he said. “If they fail to cease and desist in outsourcing their ‘fact checking’ to this bad faith, agenda-driven outlet, they will face serious repercussions.”Hassol, the climate communications expert, said allowing The Daily Caller network and Check Your Fact to have oversight of news on a platform notorious for spreading false information is “a nightmare.”She worried that the platform could play a major role in highlighting climate uncertainty.“All they have to do is introduce a kernel of doubt. That’s been the playbook,” she said. “They don’t have to prove anything. All they have to do is create doubt and leave people questioning.”Reprinted from Climatewire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2019. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Facebook fact checker has ties to news outlet that promotes climate doubtcenter_img Email By Scott Waldman, E&E NewsApr. 25, 2019 , 1:55 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Mutant genes could supercharge efforts to decipher protein structures

first_img Mapping the atomic structure of proteins is crucial to understanding how they behave, but it’s painstaking work that typically requires dedicated, expensive facilities with supercooled, powerful magnets or stadium-size synchrotrons. Now, two research teams independently report this week that they’ve hit on a way to use genetic and biochemical techniques to do the job, potentially opening structural biology to many more labs. And unlike traditional methods, which visualize proteins in crystals or solution, the approach can also reveal proteins’ natural shape inside cells as they do their work, which could uncover how mutations that disrupt protein function lead to disease.“It’s fantastic,” says Douglas Fowler, a genome scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle. Fowler notes the new approach doesn’t offer the full atomic map that standard approaches do, but the general shape it provides for a protein nonetheless offers “extremely valuable” clues to its function. Plus, he says, “It could have a really big impact” on efforts to determine structures of proteins that are membrane-bound or part of large complexes, both of which are difficult to study with standard methods.Today’s most common approach for determining a protein’s structure requires coaxing millions of copies of a protein into an ordered crystal, blasting it with x-rays, and tracking their ricochets to reveal the identity and position of each atom. Alternative approaches, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cryoelectron microscopy, also require large amounts of a protein and can take months. Researchers have unraveled the structures of only about 150,000 of the millions of proteins thought to exist—and the process has taken decades. IMAGES: M. Stiffler et al./bioRxiv, https://doi.org/10.1101/667790 Some have tried to speed things up by predicting the most likely shape of a protein simply from its sequence of amino acids and probable interactions between atoms. The accuracy of such computational efforts typically lags behind experimental methods. One recent trick to improve matters has been to compare the same protein in multiple species to find pairs of amino acids that have evolved together even though they are far apart on the protein’s linear sequence. That’s a strong indication the two are close together and interact within the folded 3D molecule. But this approach works only if researchers can identify proteins that are shared by many organisms but different enough across them to identify multiple pairs of amino acids evolving in tandem, says Debora Marks, a systems biologist at Harvard Medical School in Boston.Now, separate teams led by Marks and Ben Lehner, a geneticist at the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology in Spain, have bypassed the need for evolution’s help. They independently hit on the idea of finding interacting amino acids within a protein by systematically mutating each amino acid and tracking how the changes alter the protein’s function, such as an ability to bind to another molecule. Both groups built on work on a bacterial protein fragment called GB1 by a team led by Ren Sun, a systems biologist at the University of California, Los Angeles. In 2014, Sun’s team reported creating more than half a million copies of the GB1 gene, each with one or two of its 56 amino acids changed. For the so-called single mutants, the researchers systematically swapped every amino acid for one of the 19 other options. In the double mutants, they changed pairs of amino acids, working through nearly all possible combinations. After growing bacteria with these mutant genes and isolating the proteins, Sun’s team determined the importance of GB1’s amino acids by seeing which mutants bound most tightly to its natural target, human immunoglobulin G antibodies.Marks’s and Lehner’s groups realized they could combine the binding data of the single and double mutants to determine which amino acids interact most strongly and are therefore likely sit next to each other in the protein’s 3D structure. “Sometimes we see mutations that combine to have a much more dramatic effect,” Fowler says. By tracking dozens of such occurrences and feeding the results into a structure prediction program, the teams computed the shape of GB1’s main backbone to within a few angstroms of the resolution of the already known experimental x-ray structure.The teams, who reported their success yesterday in Nature Genetics, also showed that their technique worked with other small proteins and an RNA with analogous available data. Fowler notes the same approach may be more difficult for proteins with hundreds or thousands of amino acids, because the number of mutant proteins that must be made increases exponentially as the proteins grow. But Marks is optimistic: Early indications suggest the technique can solve structures with only a fraction of all possible mutants. The approach could even work using measures of stability for proteins that lack known binding partners, Lehner’s team says.The method has other strengths. In March, Lehner and his team posted a preprint on the bioRxiv server describing its use to learn how an RNA-binding protein called TDP-43 may cause the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Insoluble aggregates of TDP-43 have been seen in neurons in the autopsied brains of many ALS patients, but the deposits may not cause the disease. So Lehner and his colleagues made 50,000 mutants of TDP-43 and tracked their toxicity in yeast cells. They found that mutant forms that aggregated were less toxic than other versions of the protein. “This is the exact opposite of what we expected,” Lehner says, cautioning that they need to confirm this result in mammalian cells. Either way, he says, it shows that scanning mutations by the thousands may offer new insights into both proteins themselves and how their structures affect health in living cells. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Email Genetic tests have revealed protein structures (red) with nearly the accuracy of x-ray structures (gray). By Robert F. ServiceJun. 18, 2019 , 5:05 PM Mutant genes could supercharge efforts to decipher protein structureslast_img read more

Toll plaza brawl BJP MP Ram Shankar Katheria claims his security men

first_img Related News Advertising SC panel chief Ram Shankar Katheria ‘threatens’ cop in audio clip gone viral: Are you challenging Yogi? The constables were identified as Vipin Kumar and Pinku Upadhyay. Vipin was attached from Aligarh while Pinku was attached from Agra. In a video of the incident that went viral, Vipin was allegedly seen firing in the air.Watch video: BJP MP’s security men thrash toll plaza employees in Agra“During scrutiny of the video, we identified police constables Vipin Kumar and Pinku Upadhyay. Pinku has been suspended by Agra SSP and a letter has been sent to Aligarh SSP seeking suspension of Vipin,” said Assistant SP, West, Ravi Kumar. agra mp toll assault case, agra mp toll plaza assault, ram Shankar Katheria, ram Shankar Katheria toll plaza assault, toll plaza work assaulted Ram Shankar Katheria is Etawah MP.TWO POLICE constables part of the security detail of BJP MP Ram Shankar Katheria, who along with an unidentified person was booked for allegedly assaulting a toll plaza employee during an argument over paying toll in Agra on Saturday, have been suspended. Meanwhile, Katheria filed a complaint with Agra police on Sunday, seeking an FIR against employees of the toll plaza for allegedly abusing and assaulting his security guards. He also alleged that Vipin fired in the air when toll plaza employees ran towards him in a bid to attack. The MP claimed Vipin and Pinku were injured in the attack.“We have received the MP’s complaint in connection with Saturday’s incident. Charges made in the complaint will be looked into during the investigation. Action would be taken if any evidence is found,” said Assistant SP Kumar. By Express News Service |Lucknow | Updated: July 8, 2019 7:24:22 am Advertising We have no right to hurt feelings… Hindus, Muslims belong to India: MoS Ram Shankar Katheria SP govt gave clean chit to Ram Shankar Katheria in 5 criminal cases 7 Comment(s)last_img read more

Five months later Tamil Nadu activist Mugilan surfaces arrested for rape

first_imgWritten by Arun Janardhanan | Chennai | Updated: July 8, 2019 9:22:46 am Best Of Express LiveChennai, Tamil Nadu News Live Updates: HC tells PWD to submit report on waterbodies; CM announces medicine kiosks On Sunday evening, the CB-CID, which is probing cases against Mugilan, registered his arrest in a case of rape. According to a senior police officer, the arrest was made in a case registered in March on a complaint by a woman from Namakkal who has taken part in many agitations with Mugilan.On February 15, the day he disappeared, Mugilan had addressed a press meet where he alleged that the Thoothukudi firing in May 2018 was a police conspiracy. Thereafter, he was to take a train from Chennai Egmore station to his home near Madurai. Investigation into a missing complaint filed by his family revealed that Mugilan did not board the Nagercoil Express on February 15 and his mobile phone was untraceable — his phone was last traced to Guduvanchery near Chennai.Activist groups feared that Mugilan was harmed or killed in a fake encounter because in the press meet before he went missing, he had named senior police officers and accused them of being behind the firing.The Madras High Court had pulled up the police for failing to trace him. T Mugilan arrest, environmental activist Mugilan arrest, Tamil Nadu activist, Sterlite activist, T Mugilan found, who is T Mugilan, T Mugilan dead, T Mugilan missing, Tamil Nadu news, Indian Express Mugilan was found at Tirupati station on SaturdayFive months after he mysteriously disappeared from a railway station in Chennai, prominent environment activist Mugilan was found on Saturday evening at Tirupati railway station in Andhra Pradesh. While the activist’s disappearance had led to state police facing charges of kidnapping him for his anti-government position and agitations, his sudden reappearance with a few Andhra police personnel has triggered speculation that he was in illegal custody of Andhra police. Chennai, Tamil Nadu News July 17 Highlights: Suriya thanks Kamal Hassan for his support; Man falls to death at Chennai airport Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach 2 Comment(s) Advertisingcenter_img Advertising After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? Activist and lawyer Henry Tiphange, who moved a petition in the high court after Mugilan’s disappearance, informed the state police that Mugilan had been spotted at Tirupati.Tiphange said Shanmugam, a classmate of Mugilan, spotted him at Tirupati station with Andhra police personnel. “He immediately alerted his family. Hearing the news, I spoke to Tamil Nadu DGP J K Tripathy and senior officers and sought immediate intervention,” he said.While Tiphange is clueless about the reasons behind Mugilan’s disappearance, he said he was happy that Mugilan is alive.DGP Tripathy told The Indian Express that they have ruled out reports that Mugilan was in the custody of Andhra police during the period when he was missing. “He was picked up from the station yesterday. We are probing the reason for his disappearance.” DMK, BJP spar over alleged imposition of Hindi in Tamil Nadu However, sources close to Mugilan and in the police said Mugilan was not in the custody of Andhra police. “He was taken into custody after he was found on the platform in a disoriented condition. He was raising slogans. He was picked up by railway police. A CB-CID team from Chennai rushed to Tirupathi after receiving the information and took him into custody. He was provided medical care at a government hospital in Vellore en route to Chennai. He is now being questioned by a team of officers in Chennai,” said a police officer.The officer added that Mugilan was unwell and showed signs of disoriented behaviour. He had also reportedly claimed that he was bitten by a dog a week ago.The fact that the 55-year-old activist faces over 200 cases and has played a key role in several agitations in Tamil Nadu had triggered suspicions over his disappearance. Related News last_img read more

US Officer accuses general of sexual misconduct

first_img united states, us, donald trump, air force, air force general us, john hyten, general john hyten, sexual misconduct, military officer, congress, investigation, evidence, world news, indian express news The officer told The Associated Press that Gen. John Hyten subjected her to a series of unwanted sexual advances by kissing, hugging and rubbing up against her in 2017 while she was one of his aides. (Source: AP)A senior military officer has accused the Air Force general tapped to be the next vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff of sexual misconduct, potentially jeopardizing his nomination. Advertising Advertising Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Post Comment(s) Related News US mulls increasing merit-based immigration to 57% Enormous potential for growth in ties with India: US Facebook should not be trusted with ‘crazy’ cryptocurrency plan – US senators “My life was ruined by this,” she told the AP.The woman asked to not be identified by name. The AP generally does not identify those who say they have been sexually assaulted.The accusations against Hyten come at a time when the Pentagon has had an unusual amount of turmoil in its senior ranks, with only an acting defense secretary for the past six months.One of President Donald Trump’s nominees for that position recently withdrew after details of his contentious divorce surfaced. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield By AP |Washington | Updated: July 11, 2019 1:25:09 pm Advertising On Sunday, an admiral selected to be the top Navy officer withdrew due to what officials said was an inappropriate professional relationship.It’s unclear when, or if, Hyten’s confirmation hearing will move forward. It has not been scheduled, despite the fact that the current vice chairman, Gen. Paul Selva, is scheduled to retire at the end of the month.Air Force Col. DeDe Halfhill, a Pentagon spokeswoman, said Wednesday that Hyten’s nomination remains on course.“With more than 38 years of service to our nation, Gen. Hyten has proven himself to be a principled and dedicated patriot,” she said. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Taking stock of monsoon rain Best Of Express A senior Air Force official said investigators went through 10,000 pages of documents, conducted interviews with as many as 50 people and pursued every lead, but did not uncover evidence to support the allegations.The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss personnel matters, added that they also found no evidence that the woman was lying. The official said Last month, Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Tammy Duckworth sent a letter to acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper asking why Hyten was not removed from his post amid the investigation. The letter, obtained by the AP, raised questions about whether he received special treatment.The woman making the allegations said she, too, wonders if Hyten received special treatment because of his rank, and she fears her honesty and motives will be questioned because of the circumstances and timing of her allegations.The woman began working for Hyten in November 2016. Though he is an Air Force general, she is in another military branch, which she asked the AP not to disclose.The officer said the unwanted sexual contact, kissing and hugging began in early 2017 and recurred several times throughout that year when she was working closely with Hyten. She said she repeatedly pushed him away and told him to stop.In December 2017, when they were in southern California for the annual Reagan National Defense Forum, Hyten came into her room wearing workout clothes and hugged her tightly and rubbed up against her, according to the woman. She said she told him to leave.Hyten then asked the woman if she was going to report him. She said she told him no.The woman said she didn’t report the incidents at the time in order to avoid embarrassment, and out of fear of retaliation. She was also thinking about retiring, and believed Hyten was as well, so she concluded that he would not pose a risk to any other service members.She later learned that she was under investigation by Strategic Command for what officials said was “toxic” leadership behavior.That allegation surprised her, she says, because Hyten was familiar with her leadership style and “encouraged” it. He had given her glowing performance reviews, some of which were reviewed by the AP.“I was not the most popular officer in the command. In fact, one could say I was not popular at all,” she said.“But I was very successful in turning around an organization.” In her interview with the AP, she showed copies of performance reviews from Hyten in which she was ranked as the top officer out of 71 on his staff. Hyten wrote that she had “unlimited potential to lead and serve with distinction as a multi-star” general.“Exceptionally competent and committed leader with the highest level of character,” Hyten wrote, adding that “her ethics are above reproach.”The investigators issued her a letter of reprimand for her leadership and she was removed from her job at Strategic Command. She submitted her retirement.But military officials in her branch of service determined her retirement was coerced and they rejected it. They then moved her to another senior job in the Washington area. More Explained Members of Congress have raised questions about the allegations and the military investigation that found insufficient evidence to charge him.The officer told The Associated Press that Gen. John Hyten subjected her to a series of unwanted sexual advances by kissing, hugging and rubbing up against her in 2017 while she was one of his aides. She said that he tried to derail her military career after she rebuffed him.The Air Force investigated the woman’s allegations, which she reported days after Hyten’s nomination was announced in April, and found there was insufficient evidence to charge the general or recommend any administrative punishment. The alleged victim remains in the military but has moved to a different job. As she moved into her position, the officer received another negative evaluation by Hyten, which she appealed. During the appeals process, Hyten was nominated for the vice chairman position.last_img read more